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**Some programs are limited. Please read solicitations carefully and consult your Office of Research for specifics, such as limited applications through your university and internal application deadlines.**

To answer a long standing motivational question to the NEWS community, “Is the Water Cycle Accelerating?” we must be able to elaborate on and respond to the related questions of “How and Why is the Water Cycle changing?” Already NEWS teams have leveraged the efforts of many NASA investigations and satellite mission teams to make advances refining our estimates of global water and energy budgets, as well as their individual variable components, and pushing these evaluations to finer spatial and temporal resolutions. These, and other studies, have revealed that in order to truly understand and describe the climatology of the water and energy cycle, one must simultaneously take into account, along with annual means, not only extreme events but infrequent but meaningful occurrences. For example, it’s important to know if a region’s annual rainfall comes primarily during a few thunderstorms or accumulates from frequent drizzle. Likewise:
• The variability of a river’s annual sediment flux to the ocean may be largely accounted for by the sediment transferred during a single flood event;
• The daily ocean latent heat flux is largely controlled by the presence or absence of clouds overhead.
• Over longer temporal scales the annual ocean latent heat flux gains significant contribution from the transfers that happen during synoptic storms;
• The climatology of extreme events, such as floods in parts of the Western US, may require consideration of other infrequent events, i.e. Atmospheric Rivers.
To address this, NASA seeks to initiate two NEWS Process Teams to investigate simultaneously water and energy cycle dynamics over ranges of temporal and spatial scales.

Deadline: Notice of intent due July 26, 2018. Proposal due September 27, 2018