Upcoming Events - Florida Climate Institute

Upcoming Events

Human activities are a significant contributor to the rise in global sea levels, which have risen about 7-8 inches since 1900 with about 3 of those inches occurring since 1993. By 2100, global sea levels are very likely to rise by 1.0-4.3 feet above year 2000 levels depending upon future emissions of greenhouse gases, though emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that a rise above 8 feet is physically possible. The amount of relative rise will not be uniform along the U.S. coastlines due to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion. As sea levels have risen, annual flood frequencies of disruptive/minor tidal flooding have been accelerating within Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities over the last couple of decades. With continued rise, it is likely that damaging/moderate coastal flooding will occur several times a year within dozens of U.S. coastal locations within the next several decades.

About the speaker: William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in nuisance-to-extreme coastal flood risk due to sea level rise (SLR). He has assessed risks to U.S. coastal military installations worldwide for the military and is an author of the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment.  He lives in Annapolis, MD to witness SLR effects first-hand.

Webinar access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change. The Fourth National Climate Assessment confirms prior assessments in concluding that the climate on our planet, including the United States, is changing, and changing rapidly. Observational evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. Documented changes include surface, atmospheric, and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; and rising sea level. Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities have been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. Changes in the characteristics of extreme events are particularly important for human safety, infrastructure, agriculture, water quality and quantity, and natural ecosystems. Some extremes have already become more frequent, intense, or of longer duration, and many extremes are expected to continue to increase or worsen, presenting substantial challenges. Heatwaves have become more frequent in the United States since the 1960s, while extreme cold temperatures and cold waves have become less frequent. Heavy rainfall is increasing in intensity and frequency across the United States and globally. These and other trends in severe weather are expected to continue. The Earth's climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. As a result, global average sea levels are expected to continue to rise. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from the new assessment, with a special focus on severe weather.

About the speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is also a Presidential Fellow at the University of Illinois, with the aim of helping the university system develop new initiatives in urban sustainability. From 2015 to early 2017, Dr. Wuebbles was Assistant Director with the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the Executive Office of the President in Washington DC.  He was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois for many years, and led the development of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment, and was its first director. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in atmospheric physics and chemistry, with over 500 scientific publications related to the Earth’s climate, air quality, and the stratospheric ozone layer. He has co-authored a number of international and national scientific assessments, including several international climate assessments led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was a leader in the 2013 IPCC international assessment and the 2014 Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. More recently, he co-led the Climate Science Special Report, the 475-page first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment published in November 2017 that assesses the science of climate change. Dr. Wuebbles has also led special assessments of the impacts of climate change on human society and ecosystems for the U.S. Midwest, the Northeast, and a special assessment for the city of Chicago. Dr. Wuebbles has received several major awards, including the Cleveland Abbe Award from the American Meteorological Society, the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and is a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.

Webinar access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

The Committee on Interventions to Increase the Resilience of Coral Reefs will hold its second workshop on August 28, 2018 in Honolulu, HI. At the workshop, the committee will hear perspectives on the opportunities and challenges for restoring coral reefs, and hold discussions focused on weighing the risks and benefits of implementing novel approaches for improving coral reef resilience. For more information go to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-2-interventions-to-increase-the-resilience-of-coral-reefs-tickets-48504797154?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=escb&utm-source=cp&utm-term=listing

On September 12-14, 2018 in San Francisco, Edmund G. Brown, Governor of California; Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of the United Nations; Michael Bloomberg, UN Special Enjoy for Cities and Climate Change; and Anand Mahindra, Chairman of the Mahindra Group, will host the Global Climate Action Summit.

 The Summit will bring together thousands of leaders from government, business, and civil society from around the world to demonstrate how the tide has turned in the race against climate change, showcase climate action taking place around the world, and inspire deeper commitments from each other and from national governments. The Summit will focus on five themes: healthy energy systems, inclusive economic growth, sustainable communities, land and ocean stewardship, and transformative climate investments. Please find more information about the Summit here: https://globalclimateactionsummit.org/faq/

Penn State is a lead academic partner with Project Drawdown, an effort to assemble peer-reviewed science to evaluate solutions that reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases and address climate change. More than 100 Penn State faculty have volunteered to help with the analysis. Penn State will host the first Drawdown International Scientific Conference on Sept. 16-18, 2019. Mark your calendar for this event.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate of Geosciences in collaboration with the Directorates for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences, Engineering, Education and Human Resources, and Biological Sciences are looking to better understand the research priorities related to advancing understanding of the impacts of coastal environmental variability and natural hazards on populated coastal regions. This emerging effort about Coastlines and People is called CoPe.

The goal of this effort is to support Coastal Research Hubs, structured using a convergent science approach, at the nexus between coastal sustainability, human dimensions, and coastal processes to transform understanding of interactions among natural, human-built, and social systems in coastal populated environments. Research Hubs will address issues operating at multiple scales, link science, community involvement, broadening participation, and education into developing pathways to sustainability in changing coastal environments.

The NSF would like to engage the scientific community in the development of priorities related to CoPe, through three regional and one virtual, concurrently-held scoping workshops on September 26-28, 2018. The goals of the workshops are to identify the research priorities and the optimal structure for research initiatives on Coastlines and People. Apply now or check out the FAQ. This activity is supported by NSF award # 1844215.

After a 10-year hiatus, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection is proud to announce the return of PLAM – the Public Land Acquisition and Management Partnership Conference. This statewide conference focuses on public land acquisition and management issues in Florida and is returning October 1-3, 2018. PLAM has typically been hosted on a rotating basis by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the five water management districts.  WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Local, regional, state, federal, non-profit and private land managers, Land acquisition specialists and agents, Water managers, Engineers, planners, attorneys, surveyors, appraisers, architects, Public officials, Non-profit groups, Consultants, Others interested in conservation land planning. CONFERENCE HOST: Florida Department of Environmental Protection. CONFERENCE COORDINATOR: Florida Atlantic University's Center for Environmental Studies. For more information go to http://www.ces.fau.edu/plam2018/index.php

Miami-Dade County will host the 10th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit on October 24-25, 2018, at the Miami Beach Convention Center. Join us in celebrating a decade of progress with critical discussions on adaptation, innovation, and resilience. The Summit will feature keynotes and panels with local, state, and federal government officials, business and nonprofit leaders, and other experts discussing plans to ensure the region not only survives, but thrives, in the face of sea level rise and other climate impacts.

This annual event is coordinated by the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, a partnership between Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe, and Palm Beach counties; their municipalities; and other partners. The Climate Leadership Summit is a major regional event focused on facilitating climate-related collaboration and knowledge sharing. The Summit attracts innovative thinkers and leaders from business, government, academia, and the nonprofit community to exchange ideas and dialogue through panel discussions and networking breaks.

Contact the Miami-Dade Office of Resilience at 305-375-5593 or by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with questions and for information on vendor, exhibit, and sponsorship opportunities.  Or visit the event website.

The Creative Time Summit is a three-day convening for thinkers, dreamers, and doers working at the intersection of art and politics. Launched in New York City in 2009, the Creative Time Summit was the first major international platform for socially engaged art, and has since grown to encompass an expanded field – featuring a range of multidisciplinary practices from music to policy making. To date, the Summit has hosted over 8,000 live attendees and hundreds of luminaries on its stage, including legendary art critic Lucy Lippard, Academy Award winning filmmaker Laura Poitras, MacArthur “Genius” award winning contemporary artist Carrie Mae Weems, #BlackLivesMatter co-founder Alicia Garza, and President of Afghanistan Ashraf Ghani. Just as significantly, the Summit is also a forum for emerging artists and thinkers to debut ideas and projects. On Saturday, November 2, the Summit will offer community driven, hour-long sessions designed to share tools, strategies, and actions with over 1000 international and local attendees. Sessions could take the form of roundtable discussions, workshops, panels, field trips, interactive performances, screenings, or other creative formats and may reflect on the themes of the larger Summit. At the same time, we encourage sessions that engage with the field of socially engaged art more broadly. The sessions can take place in English or Spanish. For more information about the summit, visit: http://creativetime.org/summit/miami-2018/.

The 2018 National Disaster Resilience Conference that will bring together the nation›s foremost voices in the disaster safety and resilience movement on November 7-9 in Clearwater Beach, FL. Keynote presentations, discussion panels, and spotlight topics will focus on the latest in science, policy, and practice to create more resilient buildings and disaster-resilient communities in the face of earthquakes, floods, hail, hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, and wildfires, as well as human-caused disasters.

Design professionals, emergency managers, financial services experts, futurists, housing experts, insurers, journalists, meteorologists, product manufacturers, risk communicators, scientists, social psychologists, and many others will come together to make this conference an innovation incubator for the disaster safety and resilience movement.

Event Website

Each year, the National Council for Science and the Environment brings together scientists, educators, policymakers, business leaders and officials at all levels of government to discuss how to use science in environmental policy and decision making. The Annual Conference provides a platform for a diverse community to learn from each other, collaborate and build long lasting relationships. This is a meeting you won't want to miss.

The 2019 Annual Conference will build upon the conversation from the previous Annual Conference, held in January 2018. Sessions will explore how systems thinking and a sustainability framework can serve society through investment in natural, built, cyber, and social infrastructure.

Event Website

Hosted by the University of Florida IFAS Extension and the Southern Rural Development Center in partnership with USDA-NIFA, this joint national conference will bring leading sustainability and energy educators and practitioners together to showcase land grant university Extension and research program successes, share challenges, and identify opportunities to strengthen our collective impacts. Extension professionals, researchers, graduate students, formal and informal educators, practitioners, and community partners are invited to participate. For more information about the Joint Summit go to http://srdc.msstate.edu/NSS+NEES/

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Sustainability and energy Extension professionals, researchers, graduate students, formal and informal educators, practitioners, and community partners are invited and encouraged to submit proposals to participate in the 2019 Joint National Sustainability Summit (NSS) & National Extension Energy Summit (NEES). Submission Deadline is October 1, 2018. Submit Proposals HERE

 

The Forum gathers the adaptation community to foster knowledge exchange, innovation and mutual support for a better tomorrow. We invite you to join the convening of adaptation practitioners from around the country focused on moving beyond adaptation awareness and planning to adaptation action.

Event Website

Keeping History Above Water: St. Augustine will explore the impacts of sea level rise on historic coastal and river communities and cultural resources through the lens of time. With the theme of Envision 2050, emphasis is placed on policies, programs, and projects that address the situation in the short-term (defined as 30 years). Presenters will share research, strategies, and case studies of real-world applications that will physically, socially, and economically transform the world as we adapt the world to sea level rise over the next few decades. Presentation and workshop proposals are encouraged from professionals, policymakers, researchers, scholars, students, and others studying and addressing rising waters and its impact on historic places and cultural resources.

This fourth iteration of Keeping History Above Water is a partnership of Flagler College, University of Florida, and the City of St. Augustine in collaboration with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Learn more at: http://historyabovewater.org/2019-st-augustine/

Leaders in the fields of historic preservation, business, culture, tourism, economics, urban planning, environment, sustainability, design, engineering and public policy are encouraged to submit proposals for lectures and workshops that focus on applied research, practical solutions, and community engagement.

Presentations will be organized by resource type over seven sessions: archaeology, architecture, cities and historic districts, cultural and natural landscapes, underrepresented heritage and communities, intangible heritage, and archives and collections. A range of topics will be explored within each session including climate science and projections, adaptation strategies, public engagement and programs, and economic impacts, among others.

CALL FOR PRESENTERS – Submissions due September 28, 2018

Presented by the Engaging Preparedness Communities working group of the National Integrated Drought Information System

Please join us for a free monthly webinar series beginning in November that will explore current research and applications on drought impacts. Understanding impacts helps planners, decision makers and resource managers reduce vulnerability to future droughts. The webinars, which start Nov. 6, 2013, are on Wednesdays, beginning at 1 p.m. Central time. Each will include:
  • a focus on a specific effort to document drought impacts and the use of this information in decision-making
  • discussion of NIDIS’ role in the emerging Impacts Community of Practice
  • a chance to ask questions via chat
  • other interactive elements.
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The Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) Tools Network Webinar Series highlights key tools and tool use case studies to help practitioners learn about tools quickly and determine their suitability for specific EBM projects. Webinars are held 1-3 times per month and typically last 1 hour.

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Brought to you by The NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP), US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Water Research Foundation, Water Environment Federation (WEF), Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), and American Water Works Association (AWWA).

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The Climate Leader is an online training in systems thinking to help fuel the global response to climate change. These materials will help you to be more effective at addressing climate change by enabling you to see the interconnections and big picture in your work. Behind the Climate Leader are decades of experience from the team at Climate Interactive and powerful ideas developed at MIT.

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The Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative is happy to announce the first webinar in the webinar/workshop series "Standardizing Sea-Level Scenarios for Gulf of Mexico Projects."

Very often projects involving sea-level rise start out with the same question - how much sea-level rise and by when? Often the processes of determining which scenarios takes a great deal of time. Additionally, different projects settle on different scenarios making it difficult to compare results between projects. The Cooperative partners have identified addressing this issue as a priority goal for 2016.

The Cooperative would like to invite experts in SLR and those who frequently work on SLR projects in the Gulf to come to collaborate in identifying recommended scenarios. The goal is a suite of recommended scenarios for use across a variety of projects as well as a brief user guide to encourage its use on the Gulf Coast.

This process will take time and instead of dealing with such a large issue with such a large group in one meeting, we are planning a series of webinars and workshops. The first webinar will happen on Feb. 11 at 10 a.m. CST, and it will be a background/kick-off webinar addressing the series goals and outlining national, regional and local scenarios.

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In this webinar series, practitioners will share information, results and lessons learned through recent work by FHWA/US DOT and State and MPO partners to make the transportation system more resilient to climate change and extreme weather events. The first track focuses on the processes used in the Gulf Coast Study, Phase 2 (Mobile) and transferable methods developed for other agencies to assess the vulnerability of transportation infrastructure. The second track focuses on FHWA's recently completed Climate Resilience Pilot program, which supported 19 pilot projects around the country to assess vulnerabilities and develop strategies to make transportation infrastructure and operations more resilient to climate change and extreme weather events.

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