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Droughts, floods, and wildfire have significant negative effects throughout much of the United States. Volume I of the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) - aka the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) - has a chapter that details how climate change exacerbates the risks of such major events. These aspects of climate change are complicated due to the interaction of the changes in temperature and precipitation. Droughts are classified by a hierarchy of meteorological, agricultural, hydrological, or socio-economic types. The effect of global warming is most pronounced on agricultural drought, a deficit of surface moisture, due to increased temperatures. Floods are determined both by extreme precipitation as well as surface characteristics, and vary both on spatial and temporal scales. Short-term extreme precipitation is widely accepted as already having been intensified by climate change and will continue as the climate warms further. Western wildfires are affected both by forest management and climate change. The former leads to changes in fuel density while the latter increases flammability. These topics, as discussed in CSSR Chapter 8, are reviewed in this talk. A

About the speaker: Michael F. Wehner is a senior staff scientist in the Computational Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Wehner’s current research concerns the behavior of extreme weather events in a changing climate, especially heat waves, intense precipitation, drought, and tropical cyclones. Before joining the Berkeley Lab in 2002, Wehner was an analyst at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Program for Climate Modeling Diagnosis and Intercomparison. He is the author or co-author of over 170 scientific papers and reports. He was a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and the second, third, and fourth U.S. National Climate Assessments. He was recently selected as a lead author for the upcoming IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. Dr. Wehner earned his master’s degree and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his bachelor’s degree in Physics from the University of Delaware.

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Diverse lines of evidence suggest that the further the climate system is 'pushed' through increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, the greater the potential for rapid changes that are difficult to model or otherwise foresee. Several examples will be presented within a risk management framework, ranging from a) the probable to b) the low probability but catastrophic should they occur.

About the speaker: Radley Horton’s research focuses on climate extremes, tail risks, climate impacts, and adaptation.  Radley was a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment. He currently Co-Chairs Columbia’s Adaptation Initiative, and is the Lead Principal Investigator for the NOAA-Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast and the WWF-Columbia University ADVANCE partnership. Radley is also the Columbia University lead for the Department of Interior-funded Northeast Climate Adaptation Center. He has also served as Deputy Lead for NASA’s Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group, charged with linking NASA’s science to its institutional stewardship. Radley also teaches in Columbia University’s Sustainable Development department. Radley is a leading climate science communicator, appearing regularly on television, radio, and in print.

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The presentation addresses estimates of different cumulative carbon budgets in light of future global warming objectives--with a particular focus on the now oft-cited 2°C goal, its origin, and the chances of meeting such an objective.

About the speaker: Benjamin DeAngelo has over 20 years of experience bridging science and policy for the stewardship of the global environment. Ben is the Deputy Director of the Climate Program Office within NOAA's research arm, and serves as the U.S. head of delegation for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), a working group under the Arctic Council. Ben was the lead author on the mitigation chapter of the Climate Science Special Report (2017), from which this presentation is largely based. Prior to starting at NOAA in 2017, Ben was the Deputy Director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and special assistant for climate change to the President's Science Advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and had a 18-year career at EPA working on climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion.

Webinar access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN: 1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# For the webcast, goto www.mymeetings.com Under "Participant Join", click "Join an Event", then add conf no: 744925156. No code is needed for the web. Be sure to install the WebEx application when logging in - the temporary application works fine.

Earth's climate system is highly interconnected, meaning that changes to the global climate influence the United States climatically and economically. In much the same way as European and Asian financial markets affect the U.S. economy, changes to ice sheet mass and energy flows in the far reaches of the planet affect our climate. Life on Earth is sensitive to climate conditions; human society is especially susceptible due to the climate-vulnerable, complex, and often fragile systems that provide food, water, energy, and security. Observed changes to the global climate affecting the United States include rising global temperatures, diminishing sea ice, melting ice sheets and glaciers, rising sea levels, etc. These documented changes have global economic and national security implications, including for the United States. For example, sea level rise alone is putting $100 billion dollars of U.S. military assets at risk, according to the Dept. of Defense. Arctic climate change continues to outpace the rest of the globe. Over the last 30 years, rapid and, in many cases, unprecedented changes to Arctic temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, land ice, and permafrost have occurred. While the Arctic may seem far away, changes in the Arctic climate system have a global reach, affecting sea level, the carbon cycle, atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and potentially the frequency of extreme weather. This presentation discusses the changes in the observed in the Arctic, the projected changes, and the potential impacts to us living the U.S.

About the speaker: Dr. Taylor is a research scientist at NASA Langley Research Center. His research focuses on understanding the mysterious life of clouds. Understanding cloud behavior provides valuable information for improving weather and climate models. Dr. Taylor received his PhD from Florida State University in 2009 and has since worked at NASA Langley Research Center receiving that 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and a NASA Early Career Achievement Medal in 2013 for his research. In 2015, he became a National Academy of Science Kavli Fellow. Dr. Taylor was appointed to the Virginia’s Climate Change and Resiliency Commission by Governor McAuliffe, a member of the science working group for the Old Dominion University led Sea Level Rise Initiative, and currently working as a lead author on the Climate Science Special Report commissioned by the NASA, NOAA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. At NASA Langley Research Center, Dr. Taylor is a member of the Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team, leads the climate processes and diagnostics research group, and serves as a member of the Science Directorate 10-year planning committee as co-lead for the Radiation Budget focus area.

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Human activities are a significant contributor to the rise in global sea levels, which have risen about 7-8 inches since 1900 with about 3 of those inches occurring since 1993. By 2100, global sea levels are very likely to rise by 1.0-4.3 feet above year 2000 levels depending upon future emissions of greenhouse gases, though emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet stability suggests that a rise above 8 feet is physically possible. The amount of relative rise will not be uniform along the U.S. coastlines due to changes in Earth's gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion. As sea levels have risen, annual flood frequencies of disruptive/minor tidal flooding have been accelerating within Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities over the last couple of decades. With continued rise, it is likely that damaging/moderate coastal flooding will occur several times a year within dozens of U.S. coastal locations within the next several decades.

About the speaker: William Sweet is a NOAA oceanographer researching changes in nuisance-to-extreme coastal flood risk due to sea level rise (SLR). He has assessed risks to U.S. coastal military installations worldwide for the military and is an author of the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment.  He lives in Annapolis, MD to witness SLR effects first-hand.

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New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change. The Fourth National Climate Assessment confirms prior assessments in concluding that the climate on our planet, including the United States, is changing, and changing rapidly. Observational evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. Documented changes include surface, atmospheric, and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; and rising sea level. Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities have been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. Changes in the characteristics of extreme events are particularly important for human safety, infrastructure, agriculture, water quality and quantity, and natural ecosystems. Some extremes have already become more frequent, intense, or of longer duration, and many extremes are expected to continue to increase or worsen, presenting substantial challenges. Heatwaves have become more frequent in the United States since the 1960s, while extreme cold temperatures and cold waves have become less frequent. Heavy rainfall is increasing in intensity and frequency across the United States and globally. These and other trends in severe weather are expected to continue. The Earth's climate is projected to continue to change over this century and beyond. As a result, global average sea levels are expected to continue to rise. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from the new assessment, with a special focus on severe weather.

About the speaker: Donald J. Wuebbles is the Harry E. Preble Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. He is also a Presidential Fellow at the University of Illinois, with the aim of helping the university system develop new initiatives in urban sustainability. From 2015 to early 2017, Dr. Wuebbles was Assistant Director with the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the Executive Office of the President in Washington DC.  He was Head of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois for many years, and led the development of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment, and was its first director. Dr. Wuebbles is an expert in atmospheric physics and chemistry, with over 500 scientific publications related to the Earth’s climate, air quality, and the stratospheric ozone layer. He has co-authored a number of international and national scientific assessments, including several international climate assessments led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was a leader in the 2013 IPCC international assessment and the 2014 Third U.S. National Climate Assessment. More recently, he co-led the Climate Science Special Report, the 475-page first volume of the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment published in November 2017 that assesses the science of climate change. Dr. Wuebbles has also led special assessments of the impacts of climate change on human society and ecosystems for the U.S. Midwest, the Northeast, and a special assessment for the city of Chicago. Dr. Wuebbles has received several major awards, including the Cleveland Abbe Award from the American Meteorological Society, the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and is a Fellow of three major professional science societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.

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On September 12-14, 2018 in San Francisco, Edmund G. Brown, Governor of California; Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of the United Nations; Michael Bloomberg, UN Special Enjoy for Cities and Climate Change; and Anand Mahindra, Chairman of the Mahindra Group, will host the Global Climate Action Summit.

 The Summit will bring together thousands of leaders from government, business, and civil society from around the world to demonstrate how the tide has turned in the race against climate change, showcase climate action taking place around the world, and inspire deeper commitments from each other and from national governments. The Summit will focus on five themes: healthy energy systems, inclusive economic growth, sustainable communities, land and ocean stewardship, and transformative climate investments. Please find more information about the Summit here: https://globalclimateactionsummit.org/faq/

Penn State is a lead academic partner with Project Drawdown, an effort to assemble peer-reviewed science to evaluate solutions that reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases and address climate change. More than 100 Penn State faculty have volunteered to help with the analysis. Penn State will host the first Drawdown International Scientific Conference on Sept. 16-18, 2019. Mark your calendar for this event.

After a 10-year hiatus, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection is proud to announce the return of PLAM – the Public Land Acquisition and Management Partnership Conference. This statewide conference focuses on public land acquisition and management issues in Florida and is returning October 1-3, 2018. PLAM has typically been hosted on a rotating basis by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the five water management districts.  WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Local, regional, state, federal, non-profit and private land managers, Land acquisition specialists and agents, Water managers, Engineers, planners, attorneys, surveyors, appraisers, architects, Public officials, Non-profit groups, Consultants, Others interested in conservation land planning. CONFERENCE HOST: Florida Department of Environmental Protection. CONFERENCE COORDINATOR: Florida Atlantic University's Center for Environmental Studies. For more information go to http://www.ces.fau.edu/plam2018/index.php

Each year, the National Council for Science and the Environment brings together scientists, educators, policymakers, business leaders and officials at all levels of government to discuss how to use science in environmental policy and decision making. The Annual Conference provides a platform for a diverse community to learn from each other, collaborate and build long lasting relationships. This is a meeting you won't want to miss.

The 2019 Annual Conference will build upon the conversation from the previous Annual Conference, held in January 2018. Sessions will explore how systems thinking and a sustainability framework can serve society through investment in natural, built, cyber, and social infrastructure.

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The Forum gathers the adaptation community to foster knowledge exchange, innovation and mutual support for a better tomorrow. We invite you to join the convening of adaptation practitioners from around the country focused on moving beyond adaptation awareness and planning to adaptation action.

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Presented by the Engaging Preparedness Communities working group of the National Integrated Drought Information System

Please join us for a free monthly webinar series beginning in November that will explore current research and applications on drought impacts. Understanding impacts helps planners, decision makers and resource managers reduce vulnerability to future droughts. The webinars, which start Nov. 6, 2013, are on Wednesdays, beginning at 1 p.m. Central time. Each will include:
  • a focus on a specific effort to document drought impacts and the use of this information in decision-making
  • discussion of NIDIS’ role in the emerging Impacts Community of Practice
  • a chance to ask questions via chat
  • other interactive elements.
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The Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) Tools Network Webinar Series highlights key tools and tool use case studies to help practitioners learn about tools quickly and determine their suitability for specific EBM projects. Webinars are held 1-3 times per month and typically last 1 hour.

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Brought to you by The NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP), US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Water Research Foundation, Water Environment Federation (WEF), Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), and American Water Works Association (AWWA).

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The Climate Leader is an online training in systems thinking to help fuel the global response to climate change. These materials will help you to be more effective at addressing climate change by enabling you to see the interconnections and big picture in your work. Behind the Climate Leader are decades of experience from the team at Climate Interactive and powerful ideas developed at MIT.

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The Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative is happy to announce the first webinar in the webinar/workshop series "Standardizing Sea-Level Scenarios for Gulf of Mexico Projects."

Very often projects involving sea-level rise start out with the same question - how much sea-level rise and by when? Often the processes of determining which scenarios takes a great deal of time. Additionally, different projects settle on different scenarios making it difficult to compare results between projects. The Cooperative partners have identified addressing this issue as a priority goal for 2016.

The Cooperative would like to invite experts in SLR and those who frequently work on SLR projects in the Gulf to come to collaborate in identifying recommended scenarios. The goal is a suite of recommended scenarios for use across a variety of projects as well as a brief user guide to encourage its use on the Gulf Coast.

This process will take time and instead of dealing with such a large issue with such a large group in one meeting, we are planning a series of webinars and workshops. The first webinar will happen on Feb. 11 at 10 a.m. CST, and it will be a background/kick-off webinar addressing the series goals and outlining national, regional and local scenarios.

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In this webinar series, practitioners will share information, results and lessons learned through recent work by FHWA/US DOT and State and MPO partners to make the transportation system more resilient to climate change and extreme weather events. The first track focuses on the processes used in the Gulf Coast Study, Phase 2 (Mobile) and transferable methods developed for other agencies to assess the vulnerability of transportation infrastructure. The second track focuses on FHWA's recently completed Climate Resilience Pilot program, which supported 19 pilot projects around the country to assess vulnerabilities and develop strategies to make transportation infrastructure and operations more resilient to climate change and extreme weather events.

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