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WUFT-TV Gainesville will air two public dialogues on climate change and public health in North Central Florida taped in Fall 2016. As part of a five-part series called “Our Community, Our Health,” one dialogue covered allergies, asthma and air quality and the other water quality in the face of changes in our region. The dialogues are companions to an exhibit at the Florida Museum of Natural History ongoing until Summer 2017.
 
Air dates and times:
2/19- 2pm and 12mid Effects of Climate Change on Allergies
2/26- 2pm and 12mid Effects of Climate Change on Water Quality
 
Video recordings of the dialogues are also available on YouTube at http://bit.ly/CommunityChatsUF. The conversations continue on social media at #CCNCFL, and facebook.com/communitychats
 
These events and exhibit were funded by UF/IFAS Research Deans’ office climate change grants in 2016 (PI Katie Stofer), produced by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication with support from the Florida Museum and Science & UF.

Policy Pub is a recurring series of brief, plain-language talks by faculty of the college on public policy issues that affect everyone. Dr. William Butler, associate professor of urban and regional planning at Florida State University, discusses how planners in Florida are responding to the long term and slowly emerging changes associated with accelerating sea level rise in the state most vulnerable to rising seas. By some measures, Florida is the most vulnerable region in the world. After the talk, the public will have the opportunity to ask questions and engage in dialogue on the topic. Policy Pubs take place in a relaxed bar atmosphere. They are free and open to the general public. No experience or prior knowledge is required.

5:30pm to 6:30 pm, Backwoods Bistro, 401 E. Tennessee St. (at Gadsden), Tallahassee

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The business of city-building is critical to Florida’s – and the nation’s – urban and economic future.  That’s why CityAge is proud to be holding the 30th edition of a CityAge conference in Fort Lauderdale on February 22 & 23, 2017.   

What are the partnerships and investments required to build the resilient American city? How and where should the billions of dollars in infrastructure spending be distributed? And how can American business, universities and cities partner to build an innovation economy?

CityAge: Florida, hosted by the City of Fort Lauderdale, will bring together leaders in business, government, design and research from around Florida, the United States and abroad to look at the ideas, investments and partnerships essential to building the future.

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Over the next several decades, economic expansion and urbanization will continue along our worlds’ coasts. Coastal populations and billions of dollars of assets are at risk from intensifying and more frequent storms. Changing coastlines due to sea level rise will impact settlement patterns around the globe. The 6th iNTA2017 conference “Tropical Storms as a Setting for Adaptive Development and Architecture” will provide a platform for research projects pertaining to tropical and subtropical regions that address the most pressing social and environmental problems associated with an increasingly dense world facing climate variability, sea level rise and flooding risks in a moment when these issues are understood as critical in cities across the world. The conference organizers solicit participants working on these issues in the areas of architecture, construction, planning, historic preservation, land use and policy, engineering, real estate and environmental law, social and economic policy. iNTA2017 seeks participants whose research, implementation activities and proposals explore new opportunities for reinventing current economic and development paradigms in response to the extraordinary circumstance that tropical and subtropical regions worldwide are confronting due to storm hazards.

Abstract Submission Deadline: March 15, 2017

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Experience the unique history and culture of North Central Florida, by diving into Florida’s Springs, handling original historical documents, debating ethical water use, exploring Native American life along the Gulf Coast, and seeing water futures through art and science fiction.
Explore college life by staying in UF’s Hume Hall, the UF Honors Residential College, and enjoying social activities around the campus.
Work with 28 other students, and leading UF and Santa Fe College faculty and students, to explore what humanities disciplines like history, English, women’s studies, philosophy, archaeology, Latin American Studies, religion, and classics teach us about Florida’s water crises. And learn digital storytelling tools to share Florida’s water stories with others. By experiencing and doing research in the humanities, students will explore how our cultural and historical experiences with water help us to address Florida’s pressing water issues in the future.

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The Humanities and the Sunshine State educator program provides an opportunity for formal and informal educators across disciplines and grades to participate in activities and discussions linking the study of human culture and the environment. The program is offered in partnership with the Florida Humanities Council’s Educator Workshop Series with major funding provided by the Florida Humanities Council.

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