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Author Malone, S.L.; Barr, J.; Fuentes, J.D.; Oberbauer, S.F.; Staudhammer, C.L.; Gaiser, E.E.; Starr, G.
Title Sensitivity to Low-Temperature Events: Implications for CO2 Dynamics in Subtropical Coastal Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Wetlands Abbreviated Journal Wetlands
Volume 36 Issue 5 Pages 957-967
Keywords Low-temperature events; Everglades National Park; Ecosystem sensitivity; CO2 fluxes; Eddy covariance; ARIMA models
Abstract We analyzed the ecosystem effects of low-temperature events (< 5 A degrees C) over 4 years (2009-2012) in subtropical short and long hydroperiod freshwater marsh and mangrove forests within Everglades National Park. To evaluate changes in ecosystem productivity, we measured temporal patterns of CO2 and the normalized difference vegetation index over the study period. Both water levels and distance from the coast influenced the ecosystem response to low-temperature events. Photosynthetic capacity, or the maximum CO2 uptake rate, and sensitivity to low-temperature events were much higher in mangrove forest than in freshwater marsh ecosystems. During low-temperature events photosynthetic capacity was enhanced in freshwater marsh while it declined in mangrove forests, and respiration rates declined across Everglades ecosystems. While the long hydroperiod freshwater marsh gained 0.26 g CO2 m(-2) during low-temperature events, the mangrove forest had the greatest C lost (7.11 g CO2 m(-2) low-temperature event(-1)) followed by the short hydroperiod freshwater marsh (0.37 g CO2 m(-2) low-temperature event(-1)). Results suggest that shifts in the frequency and intensity of weather anomalies with climate change can alter C assimilation rates in Everglades ecosystems through effects on the photosynthetic capacity of existing species, which might lead to changes in species composition and ecosystem productivity in the future.
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ISSN 0277-5212 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1227
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Author Martinez, C.J.; Maleski, J.J.; Miller, M.F.
Title Trends in precipitation and temperature in Florida, USA Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Hydrology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Hydrology
Volume 452-453 Issue Pages 259-281
Keywords Trend; Precipitation; Temperature
Abstract permutation procedure. Field significant trends in seasonal precipitation were found in only the June-August and March-May seasons for the 1895-2009 and 1970-2009 time periods, respectively. Significant decreasing trends in monthly precipitation were found in the months of October and May for the 1895-2009 and 1970-2009 time periods, respectively. Field significant trends were found for all temperature variables for both time periods, with the largest number of stations with significant trends occurring in the summer and autumn months. Trends in mean, maximum, and minimum temperature were generally positive with a higher proportion of positive trends in the 1970-2009 period. The spatial coherence of trends in temperature range was generally less compared to other temperature variables, with a larger proportion of stations showing negative trends in the summer and positive trends at other times of the year and more negative trends found in the 1970-2009 period. Significant differences in temperature trends based on the surrounding land use were found for minimum temperature and temperature range in the 1970-2009 period indicating that data homogenization of the USHCN temperature data did not fully remove this influence. The evaluation of trends based on station exposure ratings shows significant differences in temperature variables in both the 1895-2009 and 1970-2009 time periods. Systematic changes in trends can be seen in the 1980s, the period of widespread conversion from liquid-in-glass to electronic measurement, indicating that some of the differences found may be due to uncorrected inhomogeneities. Since notable differences were found between differently rated stations pre-1940, a time which the present-day rating should have little to no influence, attribution of differences based on station rating should be done with caution.
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ISSN 0022-1694 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 277
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Author Martinez, E.; Hendricks, E.; Menze, M.A.; Torres, J.J.
Title Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
Volume 191 Issue Pages 216-225
Keywords Temperature; Marine; Mitochondria; Teleostei; Lagodon; Micropogonias; Caranx; Eugerres; OXPHOS; Leak
Abstract Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40 degrees C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between 02 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of KIP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 906
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Author Misra, V; Stroman, A; DiNapoli, S
Title The rendition of the Atlantic Warm Pool in the reanalyses Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim. Dyn.
Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 517-532
Keywords Atlantic Warm Pool; ENSO; Tropospheric temperature
Abstract The Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) region, which is comprised of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and parts of the northwestern tropical Atlantic Ocean, is one of the most poorly observed parts of the global oceans. This study compares three ocean reanalyses, namely the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS) of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) of NCEP, and the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) for its AWP variation. The surface temperature in these ocean reanalyses is also compared with that from the Extended Range SST version 3 (ERSSTv3) and Optimally Interpolated SST version 2 (OISSTv2) SST analyses. In addition we also compare three atmospheric reanalyses: NCEP-NCAR (R1), NCEP-DOE (R2), and CFSR for the associated atmospheric variability with the AWP. The comparison shows that there are important differences in the climatology of the AWP and its interannual variations. There are considerable differences in the subsurface ocean manifestation of the AWP with SODA (CFSR) showing the least (largest) modulation of the subsurface ocean temperatures. The remote teleconnections with the tropical Indian Ocean are also different across the reanalyses. However, all three oceanic reanalyses consistently show the absence of any teleconnection with the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. The influence of the AWP on the tropospheric temperature anomalies last for up to a one season lead and it is found to be relatively weak in R1 reanalyses. A simplified SST anomaly equation initially derived for diagnosing ENSO variability is adapted for the AWP variations in this study. The analysis of this equation reveals that the main contribution of the SST variation in the AWP region is from the variability of the net heat flux. All three reanalyses consistently show that the role of the ocean advective terms, including that associated with upwelling in the AWP region, is comparatively much smaller. The covariance of the SST tendency in the AWP with the net heat flux is large, with significant contribution from the variations of the surface shortwave and longwave fluxes.
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 276
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Author Mu, C.; Wu, X.; Zhao, Q.; Smoak, J. M.; Yang, Y.; Hu, L.; Zhong, W.; Liu, G.; Xu, H.; Zhang, T.
Title Relict mountain permafrost area (Loess Plateau, China) exhibits high ecosystem respiration rates and accelerating rates in response to warming Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences Abbreviated Journal
Volume 122 Issue 10 Pages 2580-2592
Keywords relict permafrost; ecosystem respiration; temperature sensitivity; freeze-thaw process; experimental warming
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1676
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Author Nicholson, S.E.; Nash, D.J.; Chase, B.M.; Grab, S.W.; Shanahan, T.M.; Verschuren, D.; Asrat, A.; Lezine, A.-M.; Umer, M.
Title Temperature variability over Africa during the last 2000 years Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication The Holocene Abbreviated Journal The Holocene
Volume 23 Issue 8 Pages 1085-1094
Keywords Africa; "Little Ice Age'; "Medieval Climate Anomaly'; temperature variability; 20th century
Abstract A growing number of proxy, historical and instrumental data sets are now available from continental Africa through which past variations in temperature can be assessed. This paper, co-authored by members of the PAGES Africa2k Working Group, synthesises published material to produce a record of temperature variability for Africa as a whole spanning the last 2000 years. The paper focuses on temperature variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly' (MCA), Little Ice Age' (LIA) and late 19th-early 21st centuries. Warmer conditions during the MCA are evident in records from Lake Tanganyika in central Africa, the Ethiopian Highlands in northeastern Africa, and Cango Cave, the Kuiseb River and Wonderkrater in southern Africa. Other records covering the MCA give ambiguous signals. Warming appears to have been greater during the early MCA (c. ad 1000) in parts of southern Africa and during the later MCA (from ad 1100) in Namibia, Ethiopia and at Lake Tanganyika. LIA cooling is evident in Ethiopian and southern African pollen records and in organic biomarker data from Lake Malawi in southeastern tropical Africa, while at Lake Tanganyika the temperature depression appears to have been less consistent. A warming trend in mean annual temperatures is clearly evident from historical and instrumental data covering the late 19th to early 21st centuries. General warming has occurred over Africa since the 1880s punctuated only by a period of cooling in the mid 20th century. The rate of temperature increase appears to have accelerated towards the end of the 20th century. The few long high-resolution proxy records that extend into the late 20th century indicate that average annual temperatures were 1-2 degrees C higher in the last few decades than during the MCA.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6836 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 438
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Author Obeysekera, J.; Graham, W.; Sukop, M. C.; Asefa, T.; Wang, D.; Ghebremichael, K.; Mwashote, B.
Title Implications of climate change on Florida's water resources Type Book Chapter
Year 2017 Publication Florida's climate: Changes, variations, & impacts Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 83-124
Keywords Rainfall; Temperature; Groundwater; Sea level rise; Water quality; GCM; Downscaling; Uncertainties
Abstract Water resources systems in Florida are unique and exhibit significant diversity in hydrogeologic characteristics and in rainfall and temperature patterns. In many parts of the state, both surface and groundwater systems are complex, highly interconnected, and any change in hydrologic drivers such as rainfall or temperature has the potential to impact the water resources of the urban, agricultural, and ecological systems. Because of this diversity, it is not possible to present a single overall outlook regarding the implications of climate change on the water resources of the state. This chapter presents brief summaries of individual studies that are available for major water resources systems in the state, which include the Everglades, the Tampa Bay region, the St. Johns River watershed, and the Suwannee River and Apalachicola River basins. Available climate models and their downscaled versions have varying degrees of bias and lack of skill that need to be considered in impact analyses. In all regions, projected changes in rainfall, temperature, and sea level may have significant impacts on water supply, water levels in environmentally sensitive areas, flood protection, and water quality.
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Publisher Florida Climate Institute Place of Publication Gainesville, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P.; Jones, J. W.; Misra, V.; Obeysekera, J.
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1824
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Author Okamoto, D.K.; Schroeter, S.; Reed, D.C.
Title Effects of ocean climate on spatiotemporal variation in sea urchin settlement and recruitment Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal Limnol Oceanogr
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords SUPPLY-SIDE ECOLOGY; SANTA-CRUZ ISLAND; STRONGYLOCENTROTUS-PURPURATUS; KELP FORESTS; EL-NINO; BARNACLE POPULATIONS; INVERTEBRATE LARVAE; CALIFORNIA; TEMPERATURE; PATTERNS
Abstract Sea urchins are voracious herbivores that influence the ecological structure and function of nearshore ecosystems throughout the world. Like many species that produce planktonic larvae, their recruitment is thought to be particularly sensitive to climatic fluctuations that directly or indirectly affect adult reproduction and larval transport and survival. Yet how climate alters sea urchin populations in space and time by modifying larval recruitment and year-class strength on the time-scales that regulate populations remains understudied. Using a, spatially replicated weekly-biweekly data set spanning 27 yr and 1100 km of coastline, we characterized seasonal, interannual, and spatial patterns of larval settlement of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that large spatial differences in temporal patterns of larval settlement were associated with different responses to fluctuations in ocean temperature and climate. Importantly, we found a strong correlation between larval settlement and regional year class strength suggesting that such temporal and spatial variation in settlement plays an important role in controlling population dynamics. These results provide strong evidence over extensive temporal and spatial domains that climatic fluctuations shape broad-scale patterns of larval settlement and subsequent population structure of an important marine herbivore known to control the productivity, community state, and provisioning services of marine ecosystems.
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2479
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Author Parfitt,; Ummenhofer,; Buckley,; Hansen,; DArrigo,
Title Distinct seasonal climate drivers revealed in a network of tree-ring records from Labrador, Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 54 Issue 3-4 Pages 1897-1911
Keywords BLUE INTENSITY; LATEWOOD DENSITY; TEMPERATURE; DENDROCLIMATOLOGY; PRECIPITATION; STANDARDIZATION; VARIABILITY; NUNATSIAVUT; TRENDS; GULF
Abstract Traditionally, high-latitude dendroclimatic studies have focused on measurements of total ring width (RW), with the maximum density of the latewood (MXD) serving as a complementary variable. Whilst MXD has typically improved the strength of the growing season climate connection over that of RW, its measurements are costly and time-consuming. Recently, a less costly and more time-efficient technique to extract density measurements has emerged, based on lignin's propensity to absorb blue light. This Blue Intensity (BI) methodology is based on image analyses of finely-sanded core samples, and the relative ease with which density measurements can be extracted allows for significant increases in spatio-temporal sample depth. While some studies have attempted to combine RW and MXD as predictors for summer temperature reconstructions, here we evaluate a systematic comparison of the climate signal for RW and latewood BI (LWBI) separately, using a recently updated and expanded tree ring database for Labrador, Canada. We demonstrate that while RW responds primarily to climatic drivers earlier in the growing season (January-April), LWBI is more responsive to climate conditions during late spring and summer (May-August). Furthermore, RW appears to be driven primarily by large-scale atmospheric dynamics associated with the Pacific North American pattern, whilst LWBI is more closely associated with local climate conditions, themselves linked to the behaviour of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Lastly, we demonstrate that anomalously wide or narrow growth rings consistently respond to the same climate drivers as average growth years, whereas the sensitivity of LWBI to extreme climate conditions appears to be enhanced.
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ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2454
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Author Park, T.-W.; Jeong, J.-H.; Deng, Y.; Zhou, R.; Cai, M.
Title Quantitative decomposition of radiative and non-radiative contributions to temperature anomalies related to siberian high variability Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 45 Issue 5-6 Pages 1207-1217
Keywords Siberian High-related temerature change; Temperature decomposition; CFRAM; Radiative and non-radiative processess
Abstract In this study, we carried out an attribution analysis that quantitatively assessed relative contributions to the observed temperature anomalies associated with strong and weak Siberian High (SH). Relative contributions of radiative and non-radiative processes to the variation of surface temperature, in terms of both amplitude and spatial pattern, were analyzed. The strong SH activity leads to the continental-scale cold temperature anomalies covering eastern Siberia, Mongolia, East China, and Korea (i.e., SH domain). The decomposition of the observed temperature anomalies associated with the SH variation was achieved with the Coupled atmosphere–surface climate Feedback-Responses Analysis Method, in which the energy balance in the atmosphere–surface column and linearization of radiative energy perturbation are formulated. For the mean amplitude of &#8722;3.13 K of cold temperature anomaly over the SH domain, sensible heat flux is tightly connected with a cooling of &#8722;1.26 K. Atmospheric dynamics adds another &#8722;1.13 K through the large-scale cold advection originated from the high latitudes. The longwave effects of cloud and water vapor account for the remaining cold anomalies of &#8722;1.00 and &#8722;0.60 K, respectively, while surface dynamics (0.71 K) and latent heat flux (0.26 K) help to mitigate the cold temperature anomalies. Influences of ozone and albedo processes are found to be relatively weak.
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ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 744
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Author Pau, S.; Detto, M.; Kim, Y.; Still, C.J.
Title Tropical forest temperature thresholds for gross primary productivity Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages e02311
Keywords canopy temperature; climate change; ecosystem function; productivity; thermal imaging; tropical forest
Abstract Tropical forests are hyper-diverse and perform critical functions that regulate global climate, yet they are also threatened by rising temperatures. Canopy temperatures depart considerably from air temperatures, sometimes by as much as air temperatures are projected to increase by the end of this century; however, canopy temperatures are rarely measured or considered in climate change analyses. Our results from near-continuous thermal imaging of a well-studied tropical forest show that canopy temperatures reached a maximum of ~34°C, and exceeded maximum air temperatures by as much as 7°C. Comparing different canopy surfaces reveals that bark was the warmest, followed by a deciduous canopy, flowers, and coolest was an evergreen canopy. Differences among canopy surfaces were largest during afternoon hours, when the evergreen canopy cooled more rapidly than other canopy surfaces, presumably due to transpiration. Gross primary productivity (GPP), estimated from eddy covariance measurements, was more strongly associated with canopy temperatures than air temperatures or vapor pressure deficit. The rate of GPP increase with canopy temperatures slowed above ~28-29°C, but GPP continued to increase until ~31-32°C. Although future warming is projected to be greater in high-latitude regions, we show that tropical forest productivity is highly sensitive to small changes in temperature. Important biophysical and physiological characteristics captured by canopy temperatures allow more accurate predictions of GPP compared to commonly used air temperatures. Results suggest that as air temperatures continue to warm with climate change, canopy temperatures will increase at a ~40% higher rate, with uncertain but potentially large impacts on tropical forest productivity.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2121
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Author Pau, S.; Detto, M.; Kim, Y.; Still, C.J.
Title Tropical forest temperature thresholds for gross primary productivity Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages e02311
Keywords canopy temperature; climate change; ecosystem function; productivity; thermal imaging; tropical forest
Abstract Tropical forests are hyper-diverse and perform critical functions that regulate global climate, yet they are also threatened by rising temperatures. Canopy temperatures depart considerably from air temperatures, sometimes by as much as air temperatures are projected to increase by the end of this century; however, canopy temperatures are rarely measured or considered in climate change analyses. Our results from near-continuous thermal imaging of a well-studied tropical forest show that canopy temperatures reached a maximum of similar to 34 degrees C, and exceeded maximum air temperatures by as much as 7 degrees C. Comparing different canopy surfaces reveals that bark was the warmest, followed by a deciduous canopy, flowers, and coolest was an evergreen canopy. Differences among canopy surfaces were largest during afternoon hours, when the evergreen canopy cooled more rapidly than other canopy surfaces, presumably due to transpiration. Gross primary productivity (GPP), estimated from eddy covariance measurements, was more strongly associated with canopy temperatures than air temperatures or vapor pressure deficit. The rate of GPP increase with canopy temperatures slowed above similar to 28-29 degrees C, but GPP continued to increase until similar to 31-32 degrees C. Although future warming is projected to be greater in high-latitude regions, we show that tropical forest productivity is highly sensitive to small changes in temperature. Important biophysical and physiological characteristics captured by canopy temperatures allow more accurate predictions of GPP compared to commonly used air temperatures. Results suggest that as air temperatures continue to warm with climate change, canopy temperatures will increase at a similar to 40% higher rate, with uncertain but potentially large impacts on tropical forest productivity.
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ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2135
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Author Peng, J.; Ma, J.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y.; Hu, Y.'na; Li, Y.; Yue, Y.
Title Spatial-temporal change of land surface temperature across 285 cities in China: An urban-rural contrast perspective Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords China; City classification; Cross-city comparison; Land surface temperature; Spatial-temporal change; Urban heat island
Abstract As an important theme in global climate change and urban sustainable development, the changes of land surface temperature (LST) and surface urban heat island (SUHI) have been more and more focused by urban ecologists. This study used land-use data to identify the urban-rural areas in 285 cities in China and comparatively analyzed LST in urban-rural areas with the perspective of spatial-temporal dynamics heterogeneity. The results showed that, 98.9% of the cities exhibited SUHI effect in summer nighttime and the effect was stronger in northern cities than that in southern cities. In 2010, the mean SUHI intensity was the largest in summer daytime, with 4.6% of the cities having extreme SUHI of over 4 degrees C. From 2001 to 2010, the nighttime LST of most cities increased more quickly in urban areas compared with rural areas, with an increasing tendency of the urban-rural LST difference. The difference in the urban- rural LST change rate was concentrated in the range of 0-0.1 degrees C/year for 68.0% of cities in winter and 70.8% of cities in summer. For the higher LST increasing in urban areas compared with rural areas, there were more cities in summer than winter, indicating that the summer nighttime was the key temporal period for SUHI management. Based on the change slope of urban-rural LST, cities were clustered into four types and the vital and major zones for urban thermal environment management were identified in China. The vital zone included cities in Hunan, Hubei and other central rising provinces as well as the Beibu Gulf of Guangxi Province. The major zone included most of the cities in Central Plain Urban Agglomeration, Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta. These results can provide scientific basis for SUHI adaptation in China.
Address Key Laboratory for Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China. Electronic address: ymyue@isa.ac.cn
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ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2078
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Author Potter, H.; Drennan, W.M.; Graber, H.C.
Title Upper ocean cooling and air-sea fluxes under typhoons: A case study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Oceans
Volume 122 Issue 9 Pages 7237-7252
Keywords typhoon; tropical storm; air-sea interaction; fluxes; cold wake; ocean temperature
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ISSN 2169-9275 ISBN Medium
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1783
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Author Pusack, T.J.; Kimbro, D.L.; White, J.W.; Stallings, C.D.
Title Predation on oysters is inhibited by intense or chronically mild, low salinity events: Low salinity stress reduces predation Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Limnology and Oceanography Abbreviated Journal Limnol Oceanogr
Volume 64 Issue 1 Pages 81-92
Keywords PERKINSUS-MARINUS DISEASE; CRASSOSTREA-VIRGINICA; THAIS-HAEMASTOMA; CLIMATE-CHANGE; PHYSIOLOGICAL-RESPONSES; ENVIRONMENTAL-STRESS; THERMAL PHYSIOLOGY; FOOD-WEB; WATER; TEMPERATURE
Abstract Environmental stress gradients can affect species distributions and interspecific interactions. Because environmental stress depends on both intensity and duration, understanding the consequences of stress requires experiments that simultaneously manipulate both dimensions. In Apalachicola Bay, Florida (U.S.A.) the southern oyster drill (Stramonita haemastoma) is a major predator of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Drill predation appears to be salinity-dependent: in a recent field study, predation rates were positively correlated with salinity. Salinity in the bay is typically high (> 20) during the dry summer months, conditions that favor both oysters and the drill. However, periodic freshets can dramatically reduce salinity, which inhibits (or kills) drills, but not oysters. In this study, we used field measurements of salinity and drill densities to inform mesocosm experiments. We investigated the specific combinations of intensity and duration of low-salinity stress that inhibit drill predation. In these experiments, more intense salinity reductions reduced feeding both during and after the low-salinity stress event. During the event, longer durations (15 d) were necessary for mild salinity reductions (-5) to reduce the feeding rate by the same amount as a short (5 d) exposure of more intense (-10 or -15) salinity reduction. Both conditions may create a predation refuge for oysters, consistent with field observations. Given that the recent collapse of the Apalachicola Bay oyster population was preceded by several years without low-salinity events to inhibit predation, our results provide a mechanism by which a predator may have contributed to the loss of a historically productive and sustainable fishery.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3590 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2255
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Author Quesada, T.; Lucas, S.; Smith, K.; Smith, J.
Title Response to Temperature and Virulence Assessment of Fusarium circinatum Isolates in the Context of Climate Change Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Forests Abbreviated Journal Forests
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords pitch canker; loblolly pine; slash pine; pathogenicity; temperature response; screening tests; climate change
Abstract With future global temperatures predicted to increase, the relationship between a host, pathogen, and environment, becomes less predictable and epidemics may pose a greater risk to forests worldwide. Resistance breeding is an important disease management tool, but because tree species require long breeding times, it is necessary to develop techniques for testing current pathogen isolates against their hosts. Pitch canker disease of pines, caused by the pathogen Fusarium circinatum, is no exception and represents a threat to pine forests and commercial plantations worldwide, as it thrives at warm temperatures and high humidity. We tested growth of 15 F. circinatum isolates in culture at three temperatures: 25, 27, and 31 degrees C. We also evaluated the sporulation and pathogenicity of eight of the isolates on two susceptible Pinus elliotti (slash pine) open-pollinated families and one tolerant open-pollinated Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) family. Our results showed significant differences among isolates in the temperature and pathogenicity tests. All isolates showed a significant decrease in growth at 31 degrees C, although some showed similar growth at 25 and 27 degrees C. Several of the new isolates tested were more pathogenic than the isolates that the USDA Forest Service Resistance Screening Center (RSC) had been using. The new isolates have now been incorporated into their operational screening program.
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ISSN 1999-4907 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2264
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Author Raymundo, R.; Asseng, S.; Prassad, R.; Kleinwechter, U.; Concha, J.; Condori, B.; Bowen, W.; Wolf, J.; Olesen, J.E.; Dong, Q.; Zotarelli, L.; Gastelo, M.; Alva, A.; Travasso, M.; Quiroz, R.; Arora, V.; Graham, W.; Porter, C.
Title Performance of the SUBSTOR-potato model across contrasting growing conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Field Crops Research Abbreviated Journal Field Crops Research
Volume 202 Issue Pages 57-76
Keywords SUBSTOR-potato; Potato; Crop modeling; Model performance; CO2; High temperature
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ISSN 0378-4290 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1404
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Author Ren, R.-C.; Yang, Y.; Cai, M.; Rao, J.
Title Understanding the systematic air temperature biases in a coupled climate system model through a process-based decomposition method Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 45 Issue 7-8 Pages 1801-1817
Keywords Model air temperature bias; Process-based decomposition; CFRAM; FGOALS-s2
Abstract A quantitative attribution analysis is performed on the systematic atmospheric temperature biases in a coupled climate system model (flexible global ocean-atmosphere-land system model, spectral version 2) in reference to the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Re-analysis Interim data during 1979-2005. By adopting the coupled surface-atmosphere climate feedback response analysis method, the model temperature biases are related to model biases in representing the radiative processes including water vapor, ozone, clouds and surface albedo, and the non-radiative processes including surface heat fluxes and other dynamic processes. The results show that the temperature biases due to biases in radiative and non-radiative processes tend to compensate one another. In general, the radiative biases tend to dominate in the summer hemisphere, whereas the non-radiative biases dominate in the winter hemisphere. The temperature biases associated with radiative processes due to biases in ozone and water vapor content are the main contributors to the total temperature bias in the tropical and summer stratosphere. The overestimated surface albedo in both polar regions always results in significant cold biases in the atmosphere above in the summer season. Apart from these radiative biases, the zonal-mean patterns of the temperature biases in both boreal winter and summer are largely determined by model biases in non-radiative processes. In particular, the stronger non-radiative process biases in the northern winter hemisphere are responsible for the relatively larger 'cold pole' bias in the northern winter polar stratosphere.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 796
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Author Robbins,; Lisle,
Title Regional Acidification Trends in Florida Shellfish Estuaries: a 20+ Year Look at pH, Oxygen, Temperature, and Salinity Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Estuaries and Coasts Abbreviated Journal Estuaries and Coasts
Volume 41 Issue 5 Pages 1268-1281
Keywords Shellfish estuary; pH; Sea surface temperature; Salinity; Dissolved oxygen; Ocean acidification
Abstract
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1559-2723 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2064
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Author Ruane, A.C.; Hudson, N.I.; Asseng, S.; Camarrano, D.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Boote, K.J.; Thorburn, P.J.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Basso, B.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Brisson, N.; Challinor, A.J.; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, R.F.; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Kumar, S.N.; Müller, C.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.; Olesen, J.E.; Osborne, T.M.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Rötter, R.P.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stöckle, C.O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Wolf, J.
Title Multi-wheat-model ensemble responses to interannual climate variability Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Environmental Modelling & Software Abbreviated Journal Environmental Modelling & Software
Volume 81 Issue Pages 86-101
Keywords Crop modeling; Uncertainty; Multi-model ensemble; Wheat; AgMIP; Climate impacts; Temperature; Precipitation; lnterannual variability
Abstract We compare 27 wheat models' yield responses to interannual climate variability, analyzed at locations in Argentina, Australia, India, and The Netherlands as part of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) Wheat Pilot. Each model simulated 1981-2010 grain yield, and we evaluate results against the interannual variability of growing season temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation. The amount of information used for calibration has only a minor effect on most models' climate response, and even small multi-model ensembles prove beneficial. Wheat model clusters reveal common characteristics of yield response to climate; however models rarely share the same cluster at all four sites indicating substantial independence. Only a weak relationship (R-2 <= 0.24) was found between the models' sensitivities to interannual temperature variability and their response to long-term warming, suggesting that additional processes differentiate climate change impacts from observed climate variability analogs and motivating continuing analysis and model development efforts.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1364-8152 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1081
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