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Author Bradley, P.W.; Brawner MD; Raffel TR; Rohr JR; Olson DH; Blaustein, A.R.
Title Shifts in temperature influence how Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infects amphibian larvae. Type
Year 2020 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 14 Issue 9 Pages e0222237
Keywords Animals; Bufonidae/*microbiology; Chytridiomycota/*pathogenicity; Larva/microbiology; Mycoses/microbiology/*veterinary; Ranidae/*microbiology; Temperature
Abstract Many climate change models predict increases in frequency and magnitude of temperature fluctuations that might impact how ectotherms are affected by disease. Shifts in temperature might especially affect amphibians, a group with populations that have been challenged by several pathogens. Because amphibian hosts invest more in immunity at warmer than cooler temperatures and parasites might acclimate to temperature shifts faster than hosts (creating lags in optimal host immunity), researchers have hypothesized that a temperature shift from cold-to-warm might result in increased amphibian sensitivity to pathogens, whereas a shift from warm-to-cold might result in decreased sensitivity. Support for components of this climate-variability based hypothesis have been provided by prior studies of the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) that causes the disease chytridiomycosis in amphibians. We experimentally tested whether temperature shifts before exposure to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) alters susceptibility to the disease chytridiomycosis in the larval stage of two amphibian species-western toads (Anaxyrus boreas) and northern red legged frogs (Rana aurora). Both host species harbored elevated Bd infection intensities under constant cold (15 degrees C) temperature in comparison to constant warm (20 degrees C) temperature. Additionally, both species experienced an increase in Bd infection abundance after shifted from 15 degrees C to 20 degrees C, compared to a constant 20 degrees C but they experienced a decrease in Bd after shifted from 20 degrees C to 15 degrees C, compared to a constant 15 degrees C. These results are in contrast to prior studies of adult amphibians highlighting the potential for species and stage differences in the temperature-dependence of chytridiomycosis.
Address Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States of America.
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Language eng Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2422
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Author Bunting, E.; Southworth, J.; Herrero, H.; Ryan, S.; Waylen, P.
Title Understanding Long-Term Savanna Vegetation Persistence across Three Drainage Basins in Southern Africa Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 7 Pages 1013
Keywords Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; precipitation; temperature; savanna; climate variability; vegetation persistence; southern Africa
Abstract Across savanna landscapes of southern Africa, people are strongly tied to the environment, meaning alterations to the landscape would impact livelihoods and socioecological development. Given the human-environment connection, it is essential to further our understanding of the drivers of savanna vegetation dynamics, and under increasing climate variability, to better understand the vegetation-climate relationship. Monthly time series of Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)- and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived vegetation indices, available from as early as the 1980s, holds promise for the large-scale quantification of complex vegetation�climate dynamics and regional analyses of landscape change as related to global environmental changes. In this work, we employ time series based analyses to examine landscape-level vegetation greening patterns over time and across a significant precipitation gradient. In this study, we show that climate induced reductions in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI; i.e., degradation or biomass decline) have had large spatial and temporal impacts across the Kwando, Okavango, and Zambezi catchments of southern Africa. We conclude that over time there have been alterations in the available soil moisture resulting from increases in temperature in every season. Such changes in the ecosystem dynamics of all three basins has led to system-wide changes in landscape greening patterns.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2119
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Author Cacciapaglia, C.; van Woesik, R.
Title Reef-coral refugia in a rapidly changing ocean Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords climate; corals; persistence; refugia; temperature
Abstract This study sought to identify climate-change thermal-stress refugia for reef corals in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. A species distribution modeling approach was used to identify refugia for 12 coral species that differed considerably in their local response to thermal stress. We hypothesized that the local response of coral species to thermal stress might be similarly reflected as a regional response to climate change. We assessed the contemporary geographic range of each species and determined their temperature and irradiance preferences using a k-fold algorithm to randomly select training and evaluation sites. That information was applied to downscaled outputs of global climate models to predict where each species is likely to exist by the year 2100. Our model was run with and without a 1 °C capacity to adapt to the rising ocean temperature. The results show a positive exponential relationship between the current area of habitat that coral species occupy and the predicted area of habitat that they will occupy by 2100. There was considerable decoupling between scales of response, however, and with further ocean warming some ‘winners’ at local scales will likely become ‘losers’ at regional scales. We predicted that nine of the 12 species examined will lose 24–50% of their current habitat. Most reductions are predicted to occur between the latitudes 5–15°, in both hemispheres. Yet when we modeled a 1 °C capacity to adapt, two ubiquitous species, Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora digitifera, were predicted to retain much of their current habitat. By contrast, the thermally tolerant Porites lobata is expected to increase its current distribution by 14%, particularly southward along the east and west coasts of Australia. Five areas were identified as Indian Ocean refugia, and seven areas were identified as Pacific Ocean refugia for reef corals under climate change. All 12 of these reef-coral refugia deserve high-conservation status.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 673
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Author Cacciapaglia, C.; van Woesik, R.
Title Climate-change refugia: shading reef corals by turbidity Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 1145-1154
Keywords climate; corals; irradiance; refuges; temperature; turbidity
Abstract Coral reefs have recently experienced an unprecedented decline as the world's oceans continue to warm. Yet global climate models reveal a heterogeneously warming ocean, which has initiated a search for refuges, where corals may survive in the near future. We hypothesized that some turbid nearshore environments may act as climate-change refuges, shading corals from the harmful interaction between high sea-surface temperatures and high irradiance. We took a hierarchical Bayesian approach to determine the expected distribution of 12 coral species in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, between the latitudes 37°N and 37°S, under representative concentration pathway 8.5 (W m&#8722;2) by 2100. The turbid nearshore refuges identified in this study were located between latitudes 20&#65533;30°N and 15&#65533;25°S, where there was a strong coupling between turbidity and tidal fluctuations. Our model predicts that turbidity will mitigate high temperature bleaching for 9% of shallow reef habitat (to 30 m depth) &#65533; habitat that was previously considered inhospitable under ocean warming. Our model also predicted that turbidity will protect some coral species more than others from climate-change-associated thermal stress. We also identified locations where consistently high turbidity will likely reduce irradiance to <250 &#956;mol m&#8722;2 s&#8722;1, and predict that 16% of reef-coral habitat &#8804;30 m will preclude coral growth and reef development. Thus, protecting the turbid nearshore refuges identified in this study, particularly in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, the northern Philippines, the Ryukyu Islands (Japan), eastern Vietnam, western and eastern Australia, New Caledonia, the northern Red Sea, and the Arabian Gulf, should become part of a judicious global strategy for reef-coral persistence under climate change.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 847
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Author Cacciapaglia, C.; van Woesik, R.
Title Marine species distribution modelling and the effects of genetic isolation under climate change Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biogeography Abbreviated Journal J Biogeogr
Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 154-163
Keywords climate; connectivity; corals; isolation; refuges; temperature
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1813
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Author Catenazzi, A.; Kupferberg, S.J.
Title Consequences of dam-altered thermal regimes for a riverine herbivore's digestive efficiency, growth and vulnerability to predation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshw Biol
Volume 63 Issue 9 Pages 1037-1048
Keywords amphibian conservation; hydropower; river; tadpole ecology; water temperature
Abstract Rivers around the world are undergoing shifts in thermal regime due to climate change and human appropriation of water resources. The local impacts of thermal regime change are challenging to predict because water temperature can influence aquatic organisms and communities at multiple levels simultaneously. For example, thermal change can influence the phenology of periphyton blooms, primary consumer physiology and behaviour, and interspecific interactions with predators. Using tadpoles of the threatened river-breeding foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii, Ranidae), their algal foods and their invertebrate predators, we mimicked dam-induced changes in temperature and observed the outcome of consumer-resource interactions. In stream enclosures, we reared tadpoles across a gradient of cold to warm conditions, quantified the ash content of diet, digestive efficiency and growth rate, and assessed their vulnerability to hemipteran and odonate predators. Tadpoles reared in a cool stream (15.5 degrees C daily mean) digested epilithic periphyton poorly (6.60.4% assimilation efficiency). In contrast, average assimilation efficiency of tadpoles reared at 19 degrees C was 11.60.1%. Access to nutritious diatoms (i.e. dinitrogen-fixing Epithemia spp., Rhopalodiaceae) increased assimilation efficiency to 10.1 +/- 0.1% and 13.8 +/- 0.1% in the cool and warm treatments, respectively. Assimilation efficiency correlated positively with tadpole growth rate (R=0.66, p<.001). The effect of temperature on mortality due to predation was mediated by low tadpole growth rates at cool temperatures and not by the temperature of predator exposure. Non-lethal effects of predators on tadpole growth and tail injury, however, depended on both rearing temperature and exposure temperature. Contrary to the expectation that the cost of predator avoidance behaviours may be greater at warmer exposure temperatures because basal metabolic rates are higher, our results indicated that the energetic cost of foraging less was amplified at cool temperatures. Our results show that when thermal conditions impair digestion in a species' early life stages, recruitment bottlenecks are likely to arise due to the combined negative effects of cool temperatures on assimilation efficiency and growth, and increased predation by invertebrates.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2132
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Author Chang, N.-B.; Imen, S.; Bai, K.; Jeffrey Yang, Y.
Title The impact of global unknown teleconnection patterns on terrestrial precipitation across North and Central America Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Atmospheric Research Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Research
Volume 193 Issue Pages 107-124
Keywords Climate change; Teleconnection; Sea surface temperature; Precipitation; North America; Central America
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-8095 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1560
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Author Chang, N.-B.; Yang, Y.J.; Imen, S.; Mullon, L.
Title Multi-scale quantitative precipitation forecasting using nonlinear and nonstationary teleconnection signals and artificial neural network models Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Hydrology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Hydrology
Volume 548 Issue Pages 305-321
Keywords Climate change; Precipitation; Sea surface temperature; Wavelet; Teleconnection patterns; Artificial neural networks; Forecasting
Abstract
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1694 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1570
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Author Chang, NB; Imen, S; Bai, K
Title Impacts of Global Non-leading Teleconnection Signals on Terrestrial Precipitation across the United States Type Conference Article
Year 2015 Publication Proceedings of SPIE Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9610 Issue Pages
Keywords Climate Change; Teleconnection Patterns; Sea Surface Temperature; Precipitation; United States
Abstract Identification of teleconnection patterns at a local scale is challenging, largely due to the coexistence of non-stationary and non-linear signals embedded within the ocean-atmosphere system. This study develops a method to overcome the problem of non-stationarity and nonlinearity and investigates how the non-leading teleconnection signals as well as the known teleconnection patterns can affect precipitation over three pristine sites in the United States. It is presented here that the oceanic indices which affect precipitation of specific site do not have commonality in different seasons. Results also found cases in which precipitation is significantly affected by the oceanic regions of two oceans within the same season. We attribute these cases to the combined physical oceanic-atmospheric processes caused by the coupled effects of oceanic regions. Interestingly, in some seasons, different regions in the South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans show more salient effects on precipitation compared to the known teleconnection patterns. Results highlight the importance of considering the seasonality scale and non-leading teleconnection signals in climate prediction.
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Area Expedition Conference Conference on Remote Sensing and Modeling of Ecosystems for Sustainability XII
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 873
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Author Clark, P.U.; Clark PU; He, F.; He F; Golledge, N.R.; Golledge NR; Mitrovica, J.X.; Mitrovica JX; Dutton, A.; Dutton A; Hoffman, J.S.; Hoffman JS; Dendy, S.; Dendy S
Title Oceanic forcing of penultimate deglacial and last interglacial sea-level rise. Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 577 Issue 7792 Pages 660-+
Keywords Animals; Antarctic Regions; Anthozoa; Coral Reefs; Foraminifera; Fossils; Greenland; History, Ancient; *Ice Cover/chemistry; Models, Theoretical; Sea Level Rise/*history; Seawater/*analysis; Temperature
Abstract Sea-level histories during the two most recent deglacial-interglacial intervals show substantial differences(1-3) despite both periods undergoing similar changes in global mean temperature(4,5) and forcing from greenhouse gases(6). Although the last interglaciation (LIG) experienced stronger boreal summer insolation forcing than the present interglaciation(7), understanding why LIG global mean sea level may have been six to nine metres higher than today has proven particularly challenging(2). Extensive areas of polar ice sheets were grounded below sea level during both glacial and interglacial periods, with grounding lines and fringing ice shelves extending onto continental shelves(8). This suggests that oceanic forcing by subsurface warming may also have contributed to ice-sheet loss(9-12) analogous to ongoing changes in the Antarctic(13,14) and Greenland(15) ice sheets. Such forcing would have been especially effective during glacial periods, when the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) experienced large variations on millennial timescales(16), with a reduction of the AMOC causing subsurface warming throughout much of the Atlantic basin(9,12,17). Here we show that greater subsurface warming induced by the longer period of reduced AMOC during the penultimate deglaciation can explain the more-rapid sea-level rise compared with the last deglaciation. This greater forcing also contributed to excess loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets during the LIG, causing global mean sea level to rise at least four metres above modern levels. When accounting for the combined influences of penultimate and LIG deglaciation on glacial isostatic adjustment, this excess loss of polar ice during the LIG can explain much of the relative sea level recorded by fossil coral reefs and speleothems at intermediate- and far-field sites.
Address Department of Geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language eng Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 (Linking) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2420
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Author Cohuo, S.; Macario-González, L.; Wagner, S.; Naumann, K.; Echeverría-Galindo, P.; Pérez, L.; Curtis, J.; Brenner, M.; Schwalb, A.
Title Influence of late Quaternary climate on the biogeography of Neotropical aquatic species as reflected by non-marine ostracodes Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Biogeosciences Abbreviated Journal Biogeosciences
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 145-161
Keywords SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES; LOWLAND CENTRAL-AMERICA; LAGO PETEN ITZA; YUCATAN PENINSULA; RAIN-FOREST; DISTRIBUTION MODELS; LAKE; PLEISTOCENE; PHYLOGEOGRAPHY; GUATEMALA
Abstract We evaluated how ranges of four endemic and non-endemic aquatic ostracode species changed in response to long-term (glacial-interglacial cycles) and abrupt climate fluctuations during the last 155 kyr in the northern Neotropical region. We employed two complementary approaches, fossil records and species distribution models (SDMs). Fossil assemblages were obtained from sediment cores PI-1, PI-2, PI-6 and Peten-Itza 22-VIII-99 from the Peten Itza Scientific Drilling Project, Lake Peten Itza, Guatemala. To obtain a spatially resolved pattern of (past) species distribution, a down-scaling cascade is employed. SDMs were reconstructed for the last interglacial (similar to 120 ka), the last glacial maximum (similar to 22 ka) and the middle Holocene (similar to 6 ka). During glacial and interglacial cycles and marine isotope stages (MISs), modelled paleo-distributions and paleo-records show the nearly continuous presence of endemic and non-endemic species in the region, suggesting negligible effects of long-term climate variations on aquatic niche stability. During periods of abrupt ecological disruption such as Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1), endemic species were resilient, remaining within their current areas of distribution. Non-endemic species, however, proved to be more sensitive. Modelled paleo-distributions suggest that the geographic range of non-endemic species changed, moving southward into Central America. Due to the uncer-tainties involved in the downscaling from the global numerical to the highly resolved regional geospatial statistical modelling, results can be seen as a benchmark for future studies using similar approaches. Given relatively moderate temperature decreases in Lake Peten Itza waters (similar to 5 degrees C) and the persistence of some aquatic ecosystems even during periods of severe drying in HS1, our data suggest (1) the existence of micro-refugia and/or (2) continuous interaction between central metapopulations and surrounding populations, enabling aquatic taxa to survive climate fluctuations in the northern Neotropical region.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1726-4189 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2384
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Author Dee, L.E.; Miller, S.J.; Peavey, L.E.; Bradley, D.; Gentry, R.R.; Startz, R.; Gaines, S.D.; Lester, S.E.
Title Functional diversity of catch mitigates negative effects of temperature variability on fisheries yields Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B
Volume 283 Issue 1836 Pages 20161435
Keywords ecosystem services; functional diversity; temperature variability; fisheries; biodiversity
Abstract Temperature variation within a year can impact biological processes driving population abundances. The implications for the ecosystem services these populations provide, including food production from marine fisheries, are poorly understood. Whether and how temperature variability impacts fishery yields may depend on the number of harvested species and differences in their responses to varying temperatures. Drawing from previous theoretical and empirical studies, we predict that greater temperature variability within years will reduce yields, but harvesting a larger number of species, especially a more functionally diverse set, will decrease this impact. Using a global marine fisheries dataset, we find that within-year temperature variability reduces yields, but current levels of functional diversity (FD) of targeted species, measured using traits related to species' responses to temperature, largely offset this effect. Globally, high FD of catch could avoid annual losses in yield of 6.8% relative to projections if FD were degraded to the lowest level observed in the data. By contrast, species richness in the catch and in the ecosystem did not provide a similar mitigating effect. This work provides novel empirical evidence that short-term temperature variability can negatively impact the provisioning of ecosystem services, but that FD can buffer these negative impacts.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1145
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Author Deng, Y.; Park, T.-W.; Cai, M.
Title Radiative and Dynamical Forcing of the Surface and Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies Associated with the Northern Annular Mode Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 26 Issue 14 Pages 5124-5138
Keywords Diabatic heating; Feedback; Radiative forcing; Temperature; Arctic Oscillation; Intraseasonal variability
Abstract On the basis of the total energy balance within an atmosphere-surface column, an attribution analysis is conducted for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) atmospheric and surface temperature response to the northern annular mode (NAM) in boreal winter. The local temperature anomaly in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) is decomposed into partial temperature anomalies because of changes in atmospheric dynamics, water vapor, clouds, ozone, surface albedo, and surface dynamics with the coupled atmosphere-surface climate feedback-response analysis method (CFRAM). Large-scale ascent/descent as part of the NAM-related mean meridional circulation anomaly adiabatically drives the main portion of the observed zonally averaged atmospheric temperature response, particularly the tropospheric cooling/warming over northern extratropics. Contributions from diabatic processes are generally small but could be locally important, especially at lower latitudes where radiatively active substances such as clouds and water vapor are more abundant. For example, in the tropical upper troposphere and stratosphere, both cloud and ozone forcings are critical in leading to the observed NAM-related temperature anomalies. Radiative forcing due to changes in water vapor acts as the main driver of the surface warming of southern North America during a positive phase of NAM, with atmospheric dynamics providing additional warming. In the negative phase of NAM, surface albedo change drives the surface cooling of southern North America, with atmospheric dynamics providing additional cooling. Over the subpolar North Atlantic and northern Eurasia, atmospheric dynamical processes again become the largest contributor to the NAM-related surface temperature anomalies, although changes in water vapor and clouds also contribute positively to the observed surface temperature anomalies while change in surface dynamics contributes negatively to the observed temperature anomalies.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 487
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Author Ditri, A.; Minnett, P.; Liu, Y.; Kilpatrick, K.; Kumar, A.
Title The Accuracies of Himawari-8 and MTSAT-2 Sea-Surface Temperatures in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 212
Keywords sea surface temperatures; geostationary satellite; infrared; tropical western Pacific Ocean; the Great Barrier Reef; accuracy
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1980
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Author Duckworth, A.; West, L.; Vansach, T.; Stubler, A.; Hardt, M.
Title Effects of water temperature and pH on growth and metabolite biosynthesis of coral reef sponges Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 462 Issue Pages 67-77
Keywords Sponges · Water temperature · pH · Climate change · Growth · Metabolite biosynthesis
Abstract Warmer, more acidic water resulting from increased emissions of greenhouse gases will impact coral reef organisms, but the effects remain unknown for many dominant groups such as sponges. To test for possible effects, adult sponges of 6 common Caribbean coral reef species—Aiolochroia crassa, Aplysina cauliformis, Aplysina fistularis, Ectyoplasia ferox, Iotrochota birotulata and Smenospongia conulosa—were grown for 24 d in seawater ranging from values experienced at present-day summer-maxima (temperature = 28°C; pH = 8.1) to those predicted for the year 2100 (temperature = 31°C; pH = 7.8). For each species, growth and survival were similar among temperature and pH levels. Sponge attachment rates, which are important for reef consolidation, were similar between pH values for all species, and highest at 31°C for E. ferox, I. birotulata and A. cauliformis. Secondary metabolites, responsible for deterring predation and fouling, were examined for A. crassa, A. cauliformis, E. ferox and I. birotulata, with 1 to 3 major metabolites quantified from each species. Final metabolite concentrations varied significantly among treatments only for zooanemonin from E. ferox and N-tele-methylhistamine from I. birotulata, but these concentrations were similar to those found in wild conspecifics. Considering adult sponges only, these findings suggest that the ecological roles and physiological processes of the 6 coral reef species will be little affected by the mean values of water temperature and pH predicted for the end of the century.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 286
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Author Edmunds, P.J.; Burgess, S.C.
Title Size-dependent physiological responses of the branching coral Pocillopora verrucosa to elevated temperature and P-CO2 Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol
Volume 219 Issue 24 Pages 3896-3906
Keywords Scleractinia; Climate change; Ocean acidification; Temperature
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1352
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Author Evans, D.; Sagoo, N.; Renema, W.; Cotton, L.J.; Müller, W.; Todd, J.A.; Saraswati, P.K.; Stassen, P.; Ziegler, M.; Pearson, P.N.; Valdes, P.J.; Affek, H.P.
Title Eocene greenhouse climate revealed by coupled clumped isotope-Mg/Ca thermometry Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
Volume 115 Issue 6 Pages 1174-1179
Keywords clumped isotope; Eocene; tropical sea-surface temperatures; polar amplification; seawater Mg/Ca
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1892
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Author Follstad Shah, J.J.; Kominoski, J.S.; Ardón, M.; Dodds, W.K.; Gessner, M.O.; Griffiths, N.A.; Hawkins, C.P.; Johnson, S.L.; Lecerf, A.; LeRoy, C.J.; Manning, D.W.P.; Rosemond, A.D.; Sinsabaugh, R.L.; Swan, C.M.; Webster, J.R.; Zeglin, L.H.
Title Global synthesis of the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter breakdown in streams and rivers Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume 23 Issue 8 Pages 3064-3075
Keywords activation energy; breakdown; carbon cycling; climate change; detritivore; leaf chemistry; metabolic theory; microbe; organic matter; temperature sensitivity
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1411
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Author Fraza, E.; Elsner, J.B.
Title A climatological study of the effect of sea-surface temperature on North Atlantic hurricane intensification Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Physical Geography Abbreviated Journal Physical Geography
Volume 36 Issue 5 Pages 395-407
Keywords urricane intensification; tropical cyclone; hurricane; sea-surface temperature; North Atlantic
Abstract The climatic influence of sea-surface temperature (SST) on intensification is examined for North Atlantic hurricanes by averaging hourly intensity increases from best-track data over the period 1986-2013 in 4 degrees by 4 degrees latitude-longitude grid cells. Independent monthly SST data over the same period are averaged in the same cells. After removing cells with cold water or fast moving hurricanes, the SST effect on intensification, at the climate scale, is quantified by regressing intensification onto SST while controlling for average intensity. The regression is performed using a generalized linear model from a gamma family and a logarithmic link function. The model shows a statistically significant relationship, with higher intensification values associated with higher SST values. On average, mean intensification increases by 16% [(9,20)% uncertainty interval] for every 1 degrees C increase in mean SST. A clustered region where the model underpredicts intensification is noted over the southeastern Caribbean Sea, perhaps related to the fresh water plume from the Orinoco River.
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ISSN 0272-3646 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1101
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Author Freeman, E.; Woodruff, S.D.; Worley, S.J.; Lubker, S.J.; Kent, E.C.; Angel, W.E.; Berry, D.I.; Brohan, P.; Eastman, R.; Gates, L.; Gloeden, W.; Ji, Z.; Lawrimore, J.; Rayner, N.A.; Rosenhagen, G.; Smith, S.R.
Title ICOADS Release 3.0: a major update to the historical marine climate record Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Climatology Abbreviated Journal Int. J. Climatol.
Volume 37 Issue 5 Pages 2211-2232
Keywords marine meteorological data; ship data; buoy data; sea-surface temperature; sea-level pressure; humidity; metadata; ocean
Abstract We highlight improvements to the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) in the latest Release 3.0 (R3.0; covering 1662&#65533;2014). ICOADS is the most widely used freely available collection of surface marine observations, providing data for the construction of gridded analyses of sea surface temperature, estimates of air&#65533;sea interaction and other meteorological variables. ICOADS observations are assimilated into all major atmospheric, oceanic and coupled reanalyses, further widening its impact. R3.0 therefore includes changes designed to enable effective exchange of information describing data quality between ICOADS, reanalysis centres, data set developers, scientists and the public. These user-driven innovations include the assignment of a unique identifier (UID) to each marine report &#65533; to enable tracing of observations, linking with reports and improved data sharing. Other revisions and extensions of the ICOADS' International Maritime Meteorological Archive common data format incorporate new near-surface oceanographic data elements and cloud parameters. Many new input data sources have been assembled, and updates and improvements to existing data sources, or removal of erroneous data, made. Coupled with enhanced &#65533;preliminary&#65533; monthly data and product extensions past 2014, R3.0 provides improved support of climate assessment and monitoring, reanalyses and near-real-time applications.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0899-8418 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1114
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