|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Ali, M.M.; Nagamani, P.V.; Sharma, N.; Venu Gopal, R.T.; Rajeevan, M.; Goni, G.J.; Bourassa, M.A.
Title Relationship between ocean mean temperatures and Indian summer monsoon rainfall: Ocean mean temperature and Indian summer monsoon rainfall Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Atmospheric Science Letters Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Sci. Lett.
Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 408-413
Keywords ocean mean temperature; Indian summer monsoon rainfall; remote sensing; sea surface height anomaly
Abstract Besides improving the understanding of the physics of the challenging problem of monsoon prediction, it is necessary to evaluate the efficiency of the input parameters used in models. Sea-surface temperature (SST) is the only oceanographic parameter applied in most of the monsoon forecasting models, which many times do not represent the heat energy available to the atmosphere. We studied the impacts of ocean mean temperature (OMT), representing the heat energy of the upper ocean, and SST on the all India summer monsoon rainfall through a statistical relation during 1993�2013 and found that OMT has a better link than SST.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1530261X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 688
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alza, C.M.; Donnelly, M.A.; Whitfield, S.M.
Title Additive effects of mean temperature, temperature variability, and chlorothalonil to red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) larvae: Temperature variability and chlorothalonil toxicity Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Environ Toxicol Chem
Volume 35 Issue 12 Pages 2998-3004
Keywords Fungicide; Amphibian; Temperature variability; Climate change
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0730-7268 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1354
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Anandhi, A.; Blocksome, C.E.
Title Developing adaptation strategies using an agroecosystem indicator: Variability in crop failure temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 76 Issue Pages 30-41
Keywords Plant ceiling threshold temperature; Climate change impacts on plants; Extreme temperature change; Drought; Cropping systems; Climate; Heat; Trend; Historic temperatures; High plains aquifer; Ogallala aquifer
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1345
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Angelo, C.L.; Daehler, C.C.
Title Temperature is the major driver of distribution patterns for C4 and C3 BEP grasses along tropical elevation gradients in Hawaii, and comparison with worldwide patterns Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Botany Abbreviated Journal Botany
Volume 93 Issue 1 Pages 9-22
Keywords climate; ecological sorting; transition temperatures; grasslands; crossover temperature model
Abstract The distribution patterns of C4 and C3 grasses in relation to climate have attracted much attention, but few studies have examined grass distributions along tropical elevation gradients. Previous studies identified either temperature, precipitation, or both variables as the major climatic factor(s) driving these distributions. Here we investigated relative dominance of C4 grasses in relation to climate along five elevation gradients in Hawai�i. The transition temperature between C4 and C3 BEP (Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae) grasses (where their relative dominance is equal) was determined; in our study, the subfamily Bambusoideae was not included. A worldwide synthesis of previous studies testing climatic factors and transition temperatures associated with C4 and C3 grass distributions was also carried out. Mean July maximum temperature was significantly correlated with C4 dominance along all elevation transects in Hawai�i, while precipitation was only correlated along three transects when precipitation was correlated with temperature. A spatially explicit multiple regression model indicated that C4 relative cover was best explained by temperature. Temperature appears to be the major climatic factor shaping distribution patterns of C4 and C3 BEP grasses in Hawai�i. According to the worldwide analysis, temperature primarily influenced grass distribution patterns more often in temperate studies (70%) than in tropical studies (45%). Degree of correlation or covariance between temperature and precipitation was rarely reported in previous studies, although this can strongly affect conclusions. C4-C3 BEP transition temperatures (mean July maximum) ranged from 18 to 21 °C in Hawai�i; these transition temperatures are lower than those reported in temperate localities (26�31 °C), but similar to transition temperatures for other localities at tropical latitudes (21�22 °C). A warming climate is likely to shift C4 grass dominance upward in elevation, threatening higher elevation native communities by perpetuating a grass�fire cycle.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1916-2790 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 627
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asseng, S.; Cammarano, D.; Basso, B.; Chung, U.; Alderman, P.D.; Sonder, K.; Reynolds, M.; Lobell, D.B.
Title Hot spots of wheat yield decline with rising temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 2464-2472
Keywords food security; irrigated spring wheat; poverty; temperature increase; yield impact
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1482
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Balling Jr., R.C.; Kiany, M.S.K.; Roy, S.S.
Title Anthropogenic signals in Iranian extreme temperature indices Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Atmospheric Research Abbreviated Journal Atmospheric Research
Volume 169 Issue Pages 96-101
Keywords Temperature extremes; Iran; Population; Weekly cycle
Abstract We analyzed spatial and temporal patterns in temperature extremes from 31 stations located throughout Iran for the period 1961 to 2010. As with many other parts of the globe, we found that the number of days (a) with high maximum temperatures was rising, (b) with high minimum temperatures was rising, and (c) with low minimum temperatures was declining; all of these trends were statistically significant at the 0.05 level of confidence. Population records from 1956 to 2011 at the station locations allowed us to reveal that the rate of human population growth was positively related to the increase in the number of days with high maximum temperatures and negatively related to days with low maximum temperatures. Our research shows a number of identifiable anthropogenic signals in the temperature records from Iran, but unlike most other studies, the signals are stronger with indices related to maximum, not minimum, temperatures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-8095 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 874
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barker, B.D.; Horodysky, A.Z.; Kerstetter, D.W.
Title Hot or not? Comparative behavioral thermoregulation, critical temperature regimes, and thermal tolerances of the invasive lionfish Pterois sp. versus native western North Atlantic reef fishes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Biological Invasions Abbreviated Journal Biol Invasions
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 45-58
Keywords Pterois sp.; Temperature preference; Thermal tolerance; Shuttlebox; CTM
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1387-3547 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1871
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barreca, A.; Deschenes, O.; Guldi, M.
Title Maybe Next Month? Temperature Shocks and Dynamic Adjustments in Birth Rates Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Demography Abbreviated Journal Demography
Volume 55 Issue 4 Pages 12691293
Keywords Birth rates; Birth seasonality; Fertility; Temperature
Abstract We estimate the effects of temperature shocks on birth rates in the United States between 1931 and 2010. We find that days with a mean temperature above 80 degrees F cause a large decline in birth rates 8 to 10 months later. Unlike prior studies, we demonstrate that the initial decline is followed by a partial rebound in births over the next few months, implying that populations mitigate some of the fertility cost by shifting conception month. This shift helps explain the observed peak in late-summer births in the United States. We also present new evidence that hot weather most likely harms fertility via reproductive health as opposed to sexual activity. Historical evidence suggests that air conditioning could be used to substantially offset the fertility costs of high temperatures.
Address Department of Economics, College of Business Administration, University of Central Florida, 4336 Scorpius Street, Orlando, FL, 32816-1400, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0070-3370 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2125
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barreras, H.J.; Barreras H Jr; Kelly, E.A.; Kelly EA; Kumar, N.; Kumar N; Solo-Gabriele, H.M.; Solo-Gabriele HM
Title Assessment of local and regional strategies to control bacteria levels at beaches with consideration of impacts from climate change. Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine pollution bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 138 Issue Pages 249-259
Keywords Beach; Climate change; Fecal indicator bacteria; Infrastructure; Temperature
Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between local factors (beach geomorphology and management) and regional factors (infrastructure improvements and temperature changes) against levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at recreational beaches. Data were evaluated for 17 beaches located in Monroe County, Florida (Florida Keys), USA, including an assessment of sanitary infrastructure improvements using equivalent dwelling unit (EDU) connections. Results show that elevated FIB levels were associated with beach geomorphologies characterized by impeded flow and by beaches with lax management policies. The decrease in EDUs not connected coincided with a decrease in the fraction of days when bacteria levels were out of compliance. Multivariate factor analysis also identified beach management practices (presence of homeless and concession stands) as being associated with elevated FIB. Overall, results suggest that communities can utilize beach management strategies and infrastructure improvements to overcome the negative water quality impacts anticipated with climate change.
Address University of Miami, Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, Coral Gables, FL, USA; NSF NIEHS Oceans and Human Health Center, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Key Biscayne, FL, USA; University of Miami, College of Engineering, Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, USA. Electronic address: hmsolo@miami.edu.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language eng Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X (Linking) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2245
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bassu, S.; Brisson, N.; Durand, J.-L.; Boote, K.; Lizaso, J.; Jones, J.W.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, A.C.; Adam, M.; Baron, C.; Basso, B.; Biernath, C.; Boogaard, H.; Conijn, S.; Corbeels, M.; Deryng, D.; De Sanctis, G.; Gayler, S.; Grassini, P.; Hatfield, J.; Hoek, S.; Izaurralde, C.; Jongschaap, R.; Kemanian, A.R.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Kim, S.-H.; Kumar, N.S.; Makowski, D.; Müller, C.; Nendel, C.; Priesack, E.; Pravia, M.V.; Sau, F.; Shcherbak, I.; Tao, F.; Teixeira, E.; Timlin, D.; Waha, K.
Title How do various maize crop models vary in their responses to climate change factors? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume 20 Issue 7 Pages 2301-2320
Keywords CO2; AgMIP; climate; maize; model intercomparison; simulation; temperature; uncertainty
Abstract Potential consequences of climate change on crop production can be studied using mechanistic crop simulation models. While a broad variety of maize simulation models exist, it is not known whether different models diverge on grain yield responses to changes in climatic factors, or whether they agree in their general trends related to phenology, growth, and yield. With the goal of analyzing the sensitivity of simulated yields to changes in temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations [CO2], we present the largest maize crop model intercomparison to date, including 23 different models. These models were evaluated for four locations representing a wide range of maize production conditions in the world: Lusignan (France), Ames (USA), Rio Verde (Brazil) and Morogoro (Tanzania). While individual models differed considerably in absolute yield simulation at the four sites, an ensemble of a minimum number of models was able to simulate absolute yields accurately at the four sites even with low data for calibration, thus suggesting that using an ensemble of models has merit. Temperature increase had strong negative influence on modeled yield response of roughly −0.5 Mg ha−1 per °C. Doubling [CO2] from 360 to 720 μmol mol−1 increased grain yield by 7.5% on average across models and the sites. That would therefore make temperature the main factor altering maize yields at the end of this century. Furthermore, there was a large uncertainty in the yield response to [CO2] among models. Model responses to temperature and [CO2] did not differ whether models were simulated with low calibration information or, simulated with high level of calibration information.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 618
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Battisti, R.; Sentelhas, P.C.; Boote, K.J.
Title Sensitivity and requirement of improvements of four soybean crop simulation models for climate change studies in Southern Brazil Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol
Volume 62 Issue 5 Pages 823-832
Keywords Carbon dioxide; Future climate scenarios; Multi-model ensemble; Rainfall; Solar radiation; Temperature
Abstract Crop growth models have many uncertainties that affect the yield response to climate change. Based on that, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of crop models to systematic changes in climate for simulating soybean attainable yield in Southern Brazil. Four crop models were used to simulate yields: AQUACROP, MONICA, DSSAT, and APSIM, as well as their ensemble. The simulations were performed considering changes of air temperature (0, + 1.5, + 3.0, + 4.5, and + 6.0 degrees C), [CO2] (380, 480, 580, 680, and 780 ppm), rainfall (- 30, - 15, 0, + 15, and + 30%), and solar radiation (- 15, 0, + 15), applied to daily values. The baseline climate was from 1961 to 2014, totalizing 53 crop seasons. The crop models simulated a reduction of attainable yield with temperature increase, reaching 2000 kg ha(-1) for the ensemble at + 6 degrees C, mainly due to shorter crop cycle. For rainfall, the yield had a higher rate of reduction when it was diminished than when rainfall was increased. The crop models increased yield variability when solar radiation was changed from - 15 to + 15%, whereas [CO2] rise resulted in yield gains, following an asymptotic response, with a mean increase of 31% from 380 to 680 ppm. The models used require further attention to improvements in optimal and maximum cardinal temperature for development rate; runoff, water infiltration, deep drainage, and dynamic of root growth; photosynthesis parameters related to soil water availability; and energy balance of soil-plant system to define leaf temperature under elevated CO2.
Address Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2050
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjorndal, K.A.; Bolten, A.B.; Chaloupka, M.; Saba, V.S.; Bellini, C.; Marcovaldi, M.A.G.; Santos, A.J.B.; Bortolon, L.F.W.; Meylan, A.B.; Meylan, P.A.; Gray, J.; Hardy, R.; Brost, B.; Bresette, M.; Gorham, J.C.; Connett, S.; Crouchley, B.V.S.; Dawson, M.; Hayes, D.; Diez, C.E.; van Dam, R.P.; Willis, S.; Nava, M.; Hart, K.M.; Cherkiss, M.S.; Crowder, A.G.; Pollock, C.; Hillis-Starr, Z.; Muñoz Tenería, F.A.; Herrera-Pavón, R.; Labrada-Martagón, V.; Lorences, A.; Negrete-Philippe, A.; Lamont, M.M.; Foley, A.M.; Bailey, R.; Carthy, R.R.; Scarpino, R.; McMichael, E.; Provancha, J.A.; Brooks, A.; Jardim, A.; López-Mendilaharsu, M.; González-Paredes, D.; Estrades, A.; Fallabrino, A.; Martínez-Souza, G.; Vélez-Rubio, G.M.; Boulon Jr, R.H.; Collazo, J.A.; Wershoven, R.; Guzmán Hernández, V.; Stringell, T.B.; Sanghera, A.; Richardson, P.B.; Broderick, A.C.; Phillips, Q.; Calosso, M.; Claydon, J.A.B.; Metz, T.L.; Gordon, A.L.; Landry Jr, A.M.; Shaver, D.J.; Blumenthal, J.; Collyer, L.; Godley, B.J.; McGowan, A.; Witt, M.J.; Campbell, C.L.; Lagueux, C.J.; Bethel, T.L.; Kenyon, L.
Title Ecological regime shift drives declining growth rates of sea turtles throughout the West Atlantic Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 4556-4568
Keywords Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; ecological regime shifts; Eretmochelys imbricata; multivariate ENSO index; sea surface temperature; seagrass; somatic growth rates
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1731
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjorndal, K.A.; Chaloupka, M.; Saba, V.S.; Diez, C.E.; van Dam, R.P.; Krueger, B.H.; Horrocks, J.A.; Santos, A.J.B.; Bellini, C.; Marcovaldi, M.A.G.; Nava, M.; Willis, S.; Godley, B.J.; Gore, S.; Hawkes, L.A.; McGowan, A.; Witt, M.J.; Stringell, T.B.; Sanghera, A.; Richardson, P.B.; Broderick, A.C.; Phillips, Q.; Calosso, M.C.; Claydon, J.A.B.; Blumenthal, J.; Moncada, F.; Nodarse, G.; Medina, Y.; Dunbar, S.G.; Wood, L.D.; Lagueux, C.J.; Campbell, C.L.; Meylan, A.B.; Meylan, P.A.; Burns Perez, V.R.; Coleman, R.A.; Strindberg, S.; Guzmán-H., V.; Hart, K.M.; Cherkiss, M.S.; Hillis-Starr, Z.; Lundgren, I.F.; Boulon Jr, R.H.; Connett, S.; Outerbridge, M.E.; Bolten, A.B.; Peters, D.P.C.
Title Somatic growth dynamics of West Atlantic hawksbill sea turtles: a spatio-temporal perspective Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e01279
Keywords climate effects; coral reefs; Eretmochelys imbricata; Greater Caribbean; marine turtles; multivariate ENSO index; sea surface temperature; somatic growth rates; West Atlantic
Abstract Somatic growth dynamics are an integrated response to environmental conditions. Hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) are long-lived, major consumers in coral reef habitats that move over broad geographic areas (hundreds to thousands of kilometers). We evaluated spatio-temporal effects on hawksbill growth dynamics over a 33-yr period and 24 study sites throughout the West Atlantic and explored relationships between growth dynamics and climate indices. We compiled the largest ever data set on somatic growth rates for hawksbills -3541 growth increments from 1980 to 2013. Using generalized additive mixed model analyses, we evaluated 10 covariates, including spatial and temporal variation, that could affect growth rates. Growth rates throughout the region responded similarly over space and time. The lack of a spatial effect or spatio-temporal interaction and the very strong temporal effect reveal that growth rates in West Atlantic hawksbills are likely driven by region-wide forces. Between 1997 and 2013, mean growth rates declined significantly and steadily by 18%. Regional climate indices have significant relationships with annual growth rates with 0- or 1-yr lags: positive with the Multivariate El Nino Southern Oscillation Index (correlation = 0.99) and negative with Caribbean sea surface temperature (correlation = -0.85). Declines in growth rates between 1997 and 2013 throughout the West Atlantic most likely resulted from warming waters through indirect negative effects on foraging resources of hawksbills. These climatic influences are complex. With increasing temperatures, trajectories of decline of coral cover and availability in reef habitats of major prey species of hawksbills are not parallel. Knowledge of how choice of foraging habitats, prey selection, and prey abundance are affected by warming water temperatures is needed to understand how climate change will affect productivity of consumers that live in association with coral reefs.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1075
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bladow, R.A.; Milton, S.L.
Title Embryonic mortality in green (Chelonia mydas) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle nests increases with cumulative exposure to elevated temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 518 Issue Pages
Keywords Climate change; Critical temperature; Development; Embryo
Abstract As climate change continues, sea turtle nests will be increasingly exposed to elevated incubation temperatures. Higher incubation temperatures influence many aspects of sea turtle development including sex determination and incubation length, but also survival. If temperatures in the nest increase above a thermal tolerance limit, then embryonic mortality may increase. The purpose of this research was to determine if there are differences in vulnerability to elevated temperatures across different stages of embryonic development and between loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtles. Temperature dataloggers recorded nest temperature in the approximate center of loggerhead and green nests laid on the Boca Raton, Florida beach during the 2016 and 2017 nesting seasons. All unhatched eggs were collected from these nests following hatchling emergence. The eggs were dissected and the developmental stage at embryonic death was determined. The point of embryonic death was compared to the nest temperatures during that stage of the incubation period to determine if death corresponded to specific periods of elevated temperatures. Elevated nest temperatures increased embryonic mortality, but no developmental stage had higher mortality rates when exposed to any specific elevated temperatures compared to embryos that had not been exposed to that temperature. The most significant relationship was between mortality and the percent of time embryos were exposed to temperatures above 34 degrees C. This resulted in greater mortality of more developed embryos, as those embryos had a longer cumulative exposure to elevated temperatures. Loggerhead turtles exhibited higher rates of mortality compared to green turtles for almost all temperature exposure periods above 34 degrees C. Although few green nests reached 34 degrees C, green sea turtle embryos in south Florida may also have a higher thermal tolerance than loggerheads. Due to the increased embryonic mortality, and therefore, decreased hatching success, future management strategies may need to protect sea turtle nests from extended periods at elevated temperatures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2339
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Blanc-Betes, E.; Welker, J.M.; Sturchio, N.C.; Chanton, J.P.; Gonzalez-Meler, M.A.
Title Winter precipitation and snow accumulation drive the methane sink or source strength of Arctic tussock tundra Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Change Biol
Volume 22 Issue 8 Pages 2818-2833
Keywords Arctic; isotope; methane; methanogenesis; methanotrophy; snow accumulation; temperature; tundra
Abstract Arctic winter precipitation is projected to increase with global warming, but some areas will experience decreases in snow accumulation. Although Arctic CH4 emissions may represent a significant climate forcing feedback, long-term impacts of changes in snow accumulation on CH4 fluxes remain uncertain. We measured ecosystem CH4 fluxes and soil CH4 and CO2 concentrations and C-13 composition to investigate the metabolic pathways and transport mechanisms driving moist acidic tundra CH4 flux over the growing season (Jun-Aug) after 18years of experimental snow depth increases and decreases. Deeper snow increased soil wetness and warming, reducing soil %O-2 levels and increasing thaw depth. Soil moisture, through changes in soil %O-2 saturation, determined predominance of methanotrophy or methanogenesis, with soil temperature regulating the ecosystem CH4 sink or source strength. Reduced snow (RS) increased the fraction of oxidized CH4 (Fox) by 75-120% compared to Ambient, switching the system from a small source to a net CH4 sink (21 +/- 2 and -31 +/- 1mgCH(4)m(-2)season(-1) at Ambient and RS). Deeper snow reduced Fox by 35-40% and 90-100% in medium- (MS) and high- (HS) snow additions relative to Ambient, contributing to increasing the CH4 source strength of moist acidic tundra (464 +/- 15 and 3561 +/- 97mgCH(4)m(-2)season(-1) at MS and HS). Decreases in Fox with deeper snow were partly due to increases in plant-mediated CH4 transport associated with the expansion of tall graminoids. Deeper snow enhanced CH4 production within newly thawed soils, responding mainly to soil warming rather than to increases in acetate fermentation expected from thaw-induced increases in SOC availability. Our results suggest that increased winter precipitation will increase the CH4 source strength of Arctic tundra, but the resulting positive feedback on climate change will depend on the balance between areas with more or less snow accumulation than they are currently facing.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1150
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bonebrake, T.C.; Brown, C.J.; Bell, J.D.; Blanchard, J.L.; Chauvenet, A.; Champion, C.; Chen, I.-C.; Clark, T.D.; Colwell, R.K.; Danielsen, F.; Dell, A.I.; Donelson, J.M.; Evengård, B.; Ferrier, S.; Frusher, S.; Garcia, R.A.; Griffis, R.B.; Hobday, A.J.; Jarzyna, M.A.; Lee, E.; Lenoir, J.; Linnetved, H.; Martin, V.Y.; McCormack, P.C.; McDonald, J.; McDonald-Madden, E.; Mitchell, N.; Mustonen, T.; Pandolfi, J.M.; Pettorelli, N.; Possingham, H.; Pulsifer, P.; Reynolds, M.; Scheffers, B.R.; Sorte, C.J.B.; Strugnell, J.M.; Tuanmu, M.-N.; Twiname, S.; Vergés, A.; Villanueva, C.; Wapstra, E.; Wernberg, T.; Pecl, G.T.
Title Managing consequences of climate-driven species redistribution requires integration of ecology, conservation and social science Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Biological Reviews Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev
Volume 93 Issue 1 Pages 284-305
Keywords adaptive conservation; climate change; food security; health; managed relocation; range shift; sustainable development; temperature
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1464-7931 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1857
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boote, JK; Rybak, MR; Scholberg, JMS; Jones, JW
Title Improving the CROPGRO-Tomato Model for Predicting Growth and Yield Response to Temperature Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal
Volume 47 Issue 8 Pages 1038-1049
Keywords cardinal temperatures; crop model parameters; development; fruit-set; fruit growth; leaf area; dry matter accumulation; fresh weight yield; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill
Abstract Parameterizing crop models for more accurate response to climate factors such as temperature is important considering potential temperature increases associated with climate change, particularly for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), which is a heat-sensitive crop. The objective of this work was to update the cardinal temperature parameters of the CROPGRO-Tomato model affecting the simulation of crop development, daily dry matter (DM) production, fruit set, and DM partitioning of field-grown tomato from transplanting to harvest. The main adaptation relied on new literature values for cardinal temperature parameters that affect tomato crop phenology, fruit set, and fruit growth. The new cardinal temperature values are considered reliable because they come from recent published experiments conducted in controlled-temperature environments. Use of the new cardinal temperatures in the CROPGRO-Tomato model affected the rate of crop development compared with prior default parameters; thus, we found it necessary to recalibrate genetic coefficients that affect life cycle phases and growth simulated by the model. The model was recalibrated and evaluated with 10 growth analyses data sets collected in field experiments conducted at three locations in Florida (Bradenton, Quincy, and Gainesville) from 1991 to 2007. Use of modified parameters sufficiently improved model performance to provide accurate prediction of crop and fruit DM accumulation throughout the season. Overall, the average root mean square error (RMSE) over all experiments was reduced 44% for leaf area index, 71% for fruit number, and 36% for both aboveground biomass and fruit dry weight simulations with the modified parameters compared with the default. The Willmott d index was higher and was always above 0.92. The CROPGRO-Tomato model with these modified cardinal temperature parameters will predict more accurately tomato growth and yield response to temperature and thus be useful in model applications.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 314
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boote, K.J.; Jones, J.W.; White, J.W.; Asseng, S.; Lizaso, J.I.
Title Putting mechanisms into crop production models: Putting mechanisms into crop production models Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Plant, Cell & Environment Abbreviated Journal Plant Cell Environ
Volume 36 Issue 9 Pages 1658-1672
Keywords carbon dioxide; crop development; crop modeling; genotype by environment; leaf area growth; photosynthesis; process-based models; reproductive; temperature; transpiration
Abstract Crop growth models dynamically simulate processes of C, N and water balance on daily or hourly time-steps to predict crop growth and development and at season-end, final yield. Their ability to integrate effects of genetics, environment and crop management have led to applications ranging from understanding gene function to predicting potential impacts of climate change. The history of crop models is reviewed briefly, and their level of mechanistic detail for assimilation and respiration, ranging from hourly leaf-to-canopy assimilation to daily radiation-use efficiency is discussed. Crop models have improved steadily over the past 3040 years, but much work remains. Improvements are needed for the prediction of transpiration response to elevated CO2 and high temperature effects on phenology and reproductive fertility, and simulation of root growth and nutrient uptake under stressful edaphic conditions. Mechanistic improvements are needed to better connect crop growth to genetics and to soil fertility, soil waterlogging and pest damage. Because crop models integrate multiple processes and consider impacts of environment and management, they have excellent potential for linking research from genomics and allied disciplines to crop responses at the field scale, thus providing a valuable tool for deciphering genotype by environment by management effects.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0140-7791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 374
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boote, K.J.; Prasad, V.; Allen Jr., L.H.; Singh, P.; Jones, J.W.
Title Modeling sensitivity of grain yield to elevated temperature in the DSSAT crop models for peanut, soybean, dry bean, chickpea, sorghum, and millet Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Agronomy Abbreviated Journal European Journal of Agronomy
Volume 100 Issue Pages 99-109
Keywords DSSAT; Crop modeling; Model parameterization; Elevated temperature; Grain-set; Grain growth rate; Photosynthesis
Abstract Crop models are increasingly being used as tools to simulate climate change effects or effects of virtual heat-tolerant cultivars; therefore it is important that upper temperature thresholds for seed-set, seed growth, phenology, and other processes affecting yield be developed and parameterized from elevated temperature experiments whether field or controlled-environment chambers. In this paper, we describe the status of crop models for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), soybean (Glycine max L.), chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), and millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. (R.) Br) in the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) for response to elevated temperature by comparison to observed data, and we review where changes have been made or where needed changes remain. Temperature functions for phenology and photosynthesis of the CROPGRO-Dry Bean model were modified in 2006 for DSSAT V4.5, based on observed growth and yield of Montcalm cultivar grown in sunlit, controlled-environment chambers. Temperature functions for soybean and peanut models were evaluated against growth and yield data in the same chambers and found to adequately predict growth and yield, thus have not been modified since 1998 release of V3.5. The temperature functions for the chickpea model were substantially modified for many processes, and are updated for V4.6. The millet model was re-coded and modified for its temperature sensitivities, with a new function to allow the 810 day period prior to anthesis to affect grain set, as parameterized from field observations. For the sorghum model, the temperature effect on grain growth rate was modified to improve yield and grain size response to elevated temperature by comparison to data in controlled-environment chambers. For reliable assessments of climate change impact, it is critically important to gather additional temperature response data and to update parameterization and code of all crop models including DSSAT.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1161-0301 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2219
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bracho, R.; Natali, S.; Pegoraro, E.; Crummer, K.G.; Schädel, C.; Celis, G.; Hale, L.; Wu, L.; Yin, H.; Tiedje, J.M.; Konstantinidis, K.T.; Luo, Y.; Zhou, J.; Schuur, E.A.G.
Title Temperature sensitivity of organic matter decomposition of permafrost-region soils during laboratory incubations Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Soil Biology and Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal Soil Biology and Biochemistry
Volume 97 Issue Pages 1-14
Keywords Temperature sensitivity (Q(10)); Tundra; Organic matter decomposition; Carbon pools; GeoChip
Abstract Permafrost soils contain more than 1300 Pg of carbon (C), twice the amount of C in the atmosphere. Temperatures in higher latitudes are increasing, inducing permafrost thaw and subsequent microbial decomposition of previously frozen C, which will most likely feed back to climate warming through release of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Understanding the temperature sensitivity (Q(10)) and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition under warming is essential to predict the future state of the climate system. Alaskan tundra soils from the discontinuous permafrost zone were exposed to in situ experimental warming for two consecutive winters, increasing soil temperature by 2.3 degrees C down to 40 cm in the soil profile. Soils obtained at three depths (0-15, 15-25 and 45-55 cm) from the experimental warming site were incubated under aerobic conditions at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C over 365 days in the laboratory. Carbon fluxes were measured periodically and dynamics of SOM decomposition, C pool sizes, and decay rates were estimated. Q(10) was estimated using both a short-term temperature manipulation (Q(10-ST)) performed at 14,100 and 280 days of incubation and via the equal C method (Q(10-EC), ratio of time taken for a soil to respire a given amount of degrees C), calculated continuously. At the same time points, functional diversities of the soil microbial communities were monitored for all incubation samples using a microbial functional gene array, GeoChip 5.0. Each array contains over 80,000 probes targeting microbial functional genes involved in biogeochemical cycling of major nutrients, remediation strategies, pathogenicity and other important environmental functions. Of these, over 20,000 probes target genes involved in the degradation of varying C substrates and can be used, to quantify the relative gene abundances and functional gene diversities related to soil organic matter turnover. The slow decomposing C pool (C-S), which represented close to 95% of total C in the top 25 cm soils, had a higher Q(10) than the fast decomposing C pool (C-F) and also dominated the total amount of C released by the end of the incubation. Overall, C-S had temperature sensitivities of Q(10-ST) = 2.55 +/- 0.03 and Q(10-EC) = 2.19 +/- 0.13, while the CF had a temperature sensitivity of Q10-EC = 1.16 +/- 0.30. In contrast to the 15 degrees C incubations, the 25 degrees C microbial communities showed reduced diversities of C-degradation functional genes in the early stage of the incubations. However, as the incubations continued the 25 degrees C communities more closely paralleled the 15 degrees C communities with respect to the detection of microbial genes utilized in the degradation of labile to recalcitrant C substrates. Two winter seasons of experimental warming did not affect the dynamics and temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition or the microbial C-degradation genes during incubation. However, under the projected sustained warming attributable to climate change, we might expect increased contribution of C-S to organic matter decomposition. Because of the higher Q(10) and the large pool size of C-S, increased soil organic matter release under warmer temperatures will contribute towards accelerating climate change.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0038-0717 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1038
Permanent link to this record