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Author NeSmith, J.E.; Alba, C.; Flory, S.L.
Title Experimental drought and plant invasion additively suppress primary pine species of southeastern US forests Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Forest Ecology and Management Abbreviated Journal Forest Ecology and Management
Volume 411 Issue Pages 158-165
Keywords Climate change; Cogongrass; Invasive species; Multiple stressors; Slash pine; Loblolly pine
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ISSN 0378-1127 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1936
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Author Quesada, T.; Lucas, S.; Smith, K.; Smith, J.
Title Response to Temperature and Virulence Assessment of Fusarium circinatum Isolates in the Context of Climate Change Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Forests Abbreviated Journal Forests
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords pitch canker; loblolly pine; slash pine; pathogenicity; temperature response; screening tests; climate change
Abstract With future global temperatures predicted to increase, the relationship between a host, pathogen, and environment, becomes less predictable and epidemics may pose a greater risk to forests worldwide. Resistance breeding is an important disease management tool, but because tree species require long breeding times, it is necessary to develop techniques for testing current pathogen isolates against their hosts. Pitch canker disease of pines, caused by the pathogen Fusarium circinatum, is no exception and represents a threat to pine forests and commercial plantations worldwide, as it thrives at warm temperatures and high humidity. We tested growth of 15 F. circinatum isolates in culture at three temperatures: 25, 27, and 31 degrees C. We also evaluated the sporulation and pathogenicity of eight of the isolates on two susceptible Pinus elliotti (slash pine) open-pollinated families and one tolerant open-pollinated Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) family. Our results showed significant differences among isolates in the temperature and pathogenicity tests. All isolates showed a significant decrease in growth at 31 degrees C, although some showed similar growth at 25 and 27 degrees C. Several of the new isolates tested were more pathogenic than the isolates that the USDA Forest Service Resistance Screening Center (RSC) had been using. The new isolates have now been incorporated into their operational screening program.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1999-4907 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2264
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Author Susaeta, A.; Lal, P.
Title Impacts of Climate Change and Bioenergy Markets on the Profitability of Slash Pine Pulpwood Production in the Southeastern United States Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Forests Abbreviated Journal Forests
Volume 9 Issue 10 Pages 656
Keywords slash pine; bioenergy; climate change; land expectation value; harvest age; Southeastern US
Abstract In this study, we assessed the impacts of climate change on the production of pulpwood and biomass for bioenergy, and the profitability of slash pine stands in the Southeastern United States. We employed the 3-PG (Physiological Processes Predicting Growth) model to determine the effects of future climates on forest growth and integrated it with a stand-level economic model to determine their impacts on optimal forest management. We found that the average production of pulpwood increased for all sites by 7.5 m3 ha−1 for all climatic scenarios and productivity conditions. In the case of forest biomass for bioenergy, the average increase was less than 1 Mg ha−1. Considering a payment for forest biomass for bioenergy of $4.2 per green Mg−1, the land expectation values (LEVs), on average, increased by $242.1 ha−1 under extreme climatic conditions and high productivity conditions. However, the increase in LEVs due to payments for biomass for bioenergy was small, accounting for $23 ha−1. We also found that the combined effect of increased site productivity and climate change reduced the optimal harvest age of slash pine. Our results confirm that emerging bioenergy markets coupled with changing climatic conditions can increase the economic returns for landowners. View Full-Text
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1999-4907 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2206
Permanent link to this record