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Author Atzori, R.; Fyall, A.; Miller, G.
Title Tourist responses to climate change: Potential impacts and adaptation in Florida's coastal destinations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Tourism Management Abbreviated Journal Tourism Management
Volume 69 Issue Pages
Keywords Climate; Adaptation; Tourism; Beach; Weather; Florida
Abstract Florida, one of the world's most visited tourist destinations, holds one of the most vulnerable positions as a result of climate change. Through a quantitative survey, this study gathered the responses of 432 tourists who had previously visited Florida, with a hypothetical scenario of changed climatic conditions. The examination of the tourist perspective showed the presence of ample sunshine and factors related to beach comfort as the reasons for choosing the destination. In a scenario were beaches disappear and tropical diseases become more widespread, the majority of respondents stated they would choose a different destination. However, respondents would reconsider their intentions if adaptation measures such as reduced prices, coastal habitat conservation and measures to protect beaches from erosion and coastal areas from inundation were in place. The findings suggest that seasonal and geographic shifts in tourism demand could be mitigated by the implementation of adaptation measures at the destination level.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0261-5177 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2172
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Author Barreras, H.J.; Barreras H Jr; Kelly, E.A.; Kelly EA; Kumar, N.; Kumar N; Solo-Gabriele, H.M.; Solo-Gabriele HM
Title Assessment of local and regional strategies to control bacteria levels at beaches with consideration of impacts from climate change. Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine pollution bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 138 Issue Pages 249-259
Keywords Beach; Climate change; Fecal indicator bacteria; Infrastructure; Temperature
Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between local factors (beach geomorphology and management) and regional factors (infrastructure improvements and temperature changes) against levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at recreational beaches. Data were evaluated for 17 beaches located in Monroe County, Florida (Florida Keys), USA, including an assessment of sanitary infrastructure improvements using equivalent dwelling unit (EDU) connections. Results show that elevated FIB levels were associated with beach geomorphologies characterized by impeded flow and by beaches with lax management policies. The decrease in EDUs not connected coincided with a decrease in the fraction of days when bacteria levels were out of compliance. Multivariate factor analysis also identified beach management practices (presence of homeless and concession stands) as being associated with elevated FIB. Overall, results suggest that communities can utilize beach management strategies and infrastructure improvements to overcome the negative water quality impacts anticipated with climate change.
Address University of Miami, Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, Coral Gables, FL, USA; NSF NIEHS Oceans and Human Health Center, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Key Biscayne, FL, USA; University of Miami, College of Engineering, Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, USA. Electronic address: hmsolo@miami.edu.
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Language eng Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X (Linking) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2245
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Author Conyers, Z.A.; Grant, R.; Roy, S.S.
Title Sea Level Rise in Miami Beach: Vulnerability and Real Estate Exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Professional Geographer Abbreviated Journal The Professional Geographer
Volume 71 Issue 2 Pages 278-291
Keywords sea level rise; miami beach; Vulnerability
Abstract Sea level rise threatens coastal communities throughout the United States, and South Florida is on the front line. The iconic and built-up city of Miami Beach, Florida, has a well-developed, high-value property market, and the municipality has been lauded for proactively taking action to adapt to anticipated sea level rise. Moving beyond hyperbole and piecemeal evidence, we compile a comprehensive inventory of adaptation and mitigation measures implemented by various municipal agencies. We employ these data sets to measure exposure and readiness for the entire city and make a preliminary effort to develop a city vulnerability index. Our findings reveal that exposure throughout the city is high and that readiness is concentrated near stormwater drainage systems, leading to high vulnerability along the coast. When we compare the spatial patterns of the vulnerability index and the residential property values, we find a mismatch. The most vulnerable regions are characterized by high income, transiency, and an apparent unresponsiveness to sea level rise. No doubt our findings illustrate a lag effect, but if sea level rise increases, the real estate market could reach a tipping point unless state and federal agencies also fund more comprehensive adaptation.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-0124 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2276
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Author Dai, H.; Ye, M.; Hu, B.X.; Niedoroda, A.W.; Zhang, X.; Chen, X.; Song, X.; Niu, J.
Title Hierarchical sensitivity analysis for simulating barrier island geomorphologic responses to future storms and sea-level rise Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Theoretical and Applied Climatology Abbreviated Journal Theor Appl Climatol
Volume 136 Issue 3-4 Pages 1495-1511
Keywords PARAMETRIC UNCERTAINTY; CLIMATE-CHANGE; MODEL; FLOW; EVOLUTION; TRANSPORT; RECOVERY; EROSION; SCALE; BEACH
Abstract This paper presents a new application of an advanced hierarchical sensitivity analysis of a new climate model of barrier island geomorphological evolution. The implemented sensitivity analysis in this study integrates a hierarchical uncertainty framework with a variance-based global sensitivity analysis to decompose the different model input uncertainties. The analysis can provide quantitative and accurate measurements for the relative importance of uncertain model input factors while considering their dependence relationships. The climate model used in this research was the barrier island profile (BIP) model, which is a new computer code developed to simulate barrier island morphological evolution over periods ranging from years to decades under the impacts of accelerated future sea-level rise and long-term changes in the storm climate. In the application of the model, the BIP model was used to evaluate the responses of a series of barrier island cross-sections derived for Santa Rosa Island, Florida, to random storm events and five potential accelerated rates of sea-level rise projected over the next century. The uncertain model input factors thus include the scenario uncertainty caused by alternative future sea-level rise scenarios and the parametric uncertainties of random storm parameters and dune characteristics. The study results reveal that the occurrence of storms is the most important factor for the evolution of sand dunes on the barrier island and the impact of sea-level rise is essential to the morphological change of the island backshore environment. The analysis can provide helpful insights for coastal management and planning. This hierarchical sensitivity analysis is mathematically general and rigorous and can be applied to a wide range of climate models.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0177-798X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2328
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Author Dai, H.; Ye, M.; Niedoroda, A.W.
Title A Model for Simulating Barrier Island Geomorphologic Responses to Future Storm and Sea-Level Rise Impacts Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Coastal Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Coastal Research
Volume 315 Issue Pages 1091-1102
Keywords Beach sand dunes; storm erosion; sediment transport; overwash; Monte Carlo; uncertainty analysis; SLOSH; Santa Rosa Island
Abstract This paper presents the Barrier Island Profile (BIP) model, a new computer code developed to simulate barrier island morphological evolution over periods ranging between years and decades under the impacts of accelerated sea-level rise and long-term changes in the storm climate. The BIP model is a multiline model that represents the time-averaged dynamics of major barrier island features from front beach to backshore. Unique contributions of BIP to coastal modeling include a dynamic linking of interacting barrier island features and consideration of both future sea-level rise and storm climate impacts. The BIP model has the built-in capability of conducting Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to quantify predictive uncertainty caused by uncertainty in sea-level rise scenarios and storm parameters. For a series of barrier island cross-sections derived from the characteristics of Santa Rosa Island, Florida, BIP was used to evaluate their responses to random storm events and five potential accelerated rates of sea-level rise projected over a century. The MC simulations using BIP provide multiple realizations of possible barrier island morphologic responses and their statistics, such as mean and variance. The modeling results demonstrate that BIP is capable of simulating realistic patterns of barrier island profile evolution over the span of a century using relatively simple representations of time-and space-averaged processes with consideration of uncertainty of future climate impacts.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0749-0208 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 755
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Author Ercolani, C.; Muller, J.; Collins, J.; Savarese, M.; Squiccimara, L.
Title Intense Southwest Florida hurricane landfalls over the past 1000 years Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Quaternary Science Reviews Abbreviated Journal Quaternary Science Reviews
Volume 126 Issue Pages 17-25
Keywords Paleotempestology; Southwest Florida; Hurricanes; Main development region; Barrier beaches
Abstract Recent research has proposed that human-induced sea surface temperature (SST) warming has led to an increase in the intensity of hurricanes over the past 30 years. However, this notion has been challenged on the basis that the instrumental record is too short and unreliable to reveal long-term trends in hurricane activity. This study addresses this limitation by investigating hurricane-induced overwash deposits (paleotempestites) behind a barrier island in Naples, FL, USA. Paleotempestologic proxies including grain size, percent calcium carbonate, and fossil shells species were used to distinguish overwash events in two sediment cores spanning the last one thousand years. Two prominent paleotempestites were observed in the top 20 cm of both cores: the first identified as Hurricane Donna in 1960 whereas an older paleotempestite (1900-1930) could represent one of three documented storms in the early 1900s. An active period of hurricane overwash from 1000 to 500 yrs. BP and an inactive period from 500 to 150 yrs. BP correlate with reconstructed SSTs from the Main Development Region (MDR) of the North Atlantic Ocean. We observe an increased number of paleotempestites when MDR SSTs are warmer, coinciding with the Medieval Warm Period, and very few paleotempestites when MDR SSTs are cooler, coinciding with the Little Ice Age. Results from this initial Southwest Florida study indicate that MDR SSTs have been a key long-term climate driver of intense Southwest Florida hurricane strikes.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0277-3791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 820
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Author Fujisaki, I.; Lamont, M.; Carthy, R.
Title Temporal shift of sea turtle nest sites in an eroding barrier island beach Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ocean & Coastal Management Abbreviated Journal Ocean & Coastal Management
Volume 155 Issue Pages 24-29
Keywords Beach loss; Coastal erosion; Coastal squeeze; Loggerhead sea turtle
Abstract
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0964-5691 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1972
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Author Leatherman, S.P.
Title Coastal Erosion and the United States National Flood Insurance Program Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ocean & Coastal Management Abbreviated Journal Ocean & Coastal Management
Volume 156 Issue Pages 35-42
Keywords Coastal erosion rates; Erosion mapping; Beachfront properties; Coastal management
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0964-5691 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2002
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Author Lindeman, K.; Giannoulis, C.; Beard, B.
Title Coastal Climate Adaptation Literatures of the Southeast and Northeast U.S.: Regional Comparisons among States and Document Sources Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Marine Science and Engineering Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords SEA-LEVEL RISE; FLORIDA; VULNERABILITY; MANAGEMENT; US; PATHWAYS; BEACH; NEEDS
Abstract Challenges remain in optimizing the use of increasingly large inflows of climate adaptation articles and guidance documents to improve coastal science and engineering practices. In addition to four major academic databases, the large grey literature was quantified by analyzing web sources of hundreds of government, nonprofit and university reports not previously included in reviews. Three spatial scales were examined for differences in amount and timing of adaptation documents: (a) between region (southeast and northeast U.S.); (b) among sub-region (Florida and Carolinas; New York/New Jersey and New England); and (c) among states (ten states total). Comparisons were also made across spatial scales for document sources (academic journals, government, non-governmental organizations (NGO), university, mixed sources), including four governance subcategories (federal, state, regional and local). Differences were identified among some spatial scales in academic vs. grey literature and among categories of grey literature. 53% of the literature was from grey sources (21% government, 10% university, 8% nonprofit and 14% mixed sources). This literature can be large and is grounded in applied, experiential knowledge, yet is unavailable in almost all academic databases. These relatively hidden documents provide insight into on-the-ground science and engineering case-histories, policy innovations, and power relationships across scales of geography and governance.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2077-1312 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2223
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Author Parkinson, R.W.; Ogurcak, D.E.
Title Beach nourishment is not a sustainable strategy to mitigate climate change Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science Abbreviated Journal Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Volume 212 Issue Pages 203-209
Keywords Beach nourishment; climate change
Abstract Some studies published over the past several decades have concluded nourishment of oceanic beaches is a viable strategy to mitigate climate change. However, these were generally too limited in scope to accurately evaluate beach nourishment because each omit one or more of the following: (1) a realistic assessment of potential borrow area sand volume, (2) native beach compatibility, (3) construction costs, (4) all vulnerable geomorphic elements of the coastal zone, and (5) environmental impacts. When all of these parameters are considered, the results are markedly different. To demonstrate our point, we evaluated the recommendations of Houston (2017) using all five parameters. Contrary to Houston, we provide multiple lines of evidence that beach fill projects are not a sustainable strategy to protect or defend oceanic beaches of the Florida panhandle (USA), nor likely most of the world's developed coastlines at risk to the effects of climate change. The nourishment of oceanic beaches as historically constructed will surely continue over the next several decades. But, it must be done as an interim strategy during the formulation and implementation of a robust, long-term adaptive management strategy that incorporates managed withdrawal from the coastline.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2200
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Author Puerres,; Bernal,; Brenner,; Restrepo-Moreno,; Kenney,
Title Sedimentary records of extreme wave events in the southwestern Caribbean Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Geomorphology Abbreviated Journal Geomorphology
Volume 319 Issue Pages 103-116
Keywords South Caribbean storms; Beach ridges; Coastal sediment records; Foraminifera
Abstract High-energy events in the Caribbean Sea include hurricanes, tropical storms, cold fronts and tsunamis. El Rosario Archipelago, located on the Colombian Caribbean shelf (SW Caribbean) consists of a set of ancient and successive coralline formations, uplifted by tectonic and diapiric activity. We undertook an integrated analysis of instrumental climate records and sediment records from a beach ridge system, a reef lagoon and a mangrove lagoon in the Archipelago, to determine whether historical extreme weather events influenced the coastal geomorphology and reef sedimentation. Statistical analysis of historical extreme winds and waves was accomplished using ERA-Interim reanalysis data. Extreme sea-level events were identified with calibrated data from the nearest tide gauge. Sediments from the reef and mangrove lagoon were dated using 210Pb and 14C. Beach ridges were dated indirectly thorough their relationship with the closure of the mangrove lagoon. The eroding capacity of the historical extreme waves (i.e. maximum grain size that could be entrained by the orbital velocity of the waves) was compared with the grain sizes present in the deposits, and foraminifera species helped to determine the provenance of those deposits. Storms typically occur during the dry season associated with cold fronts. Foraminifera and coral fragments indicated that beach ridges were supplied with sediment that eroded from ancient terraces. In the reef lagoon, a 56-cm-thick unit of coarse coral and shell debris, grading to a finer sediment, represents a major high-energy event that occurred after ca. 1655 CE. This event was also recorded by the beach ridges. The probable explanation for this high energy unit is that a strong event carried coarse sediments into the lagoon, with subsequent reworking by minor events, such as those reported in the historical record. Two tsunamis occurred in the Caribbean after 1655, but the associated waves reaching the area were not strong enough to deposit the coarser clasts of the unit. Thus, coarser material was probably delivered to the lagoon as a consequence of sudden diapiric and/or tectonic activity. Our data show that major storms and other high-wind, extreme-wave events shape the beach ridges on Rosario Island, every 70 years. The findings suggest that if global climate change increases the frequency and/or magnitude of major storms and other high-wind, extreme wave events that impact the Caribbean coast of Colombia, then El Rosario Archipelago will be susceptible to future, significant landscape transformations.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169555X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2190
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Author Stoddard, M.A.; Miller, D.L.; Thetford, M.; Branch, L.C.
Title If you build it, will they come? Use of restored dunes by beach mice Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Restoration Ecology Abbreviated Journal Restor Ecol
Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 531-537
Keywords beach mice; coastal wildlife; dune restoration; Field of Dreams hypothesis; habitat restoration; Peromyscus polionotus subspecies; poststorm recovery
Abstract Restoration of coastal habitat fragmented, degraded, or destroyed by development and climate-related processes such as sea level rise and storm surge usually involves planting native plants to restore habitat structure, but whether and how restored areas benefit taxa other than plants is rarely reported. Installing restoration plantings is one method used to build habitat such as beach dunes where dunes have been lost, potentially creating habitat for dune-dependent species. We compared use of natural vegetated dunes, open sand gaps, and restoration plantings (habitat treatment) by Perdido Key beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus trissyllepsis) over 3years using tracking tubes to assess the value of restoration plantings for beach mice. Tubes were monitored in two seasons (early and mid-summer), and under new and full moon conditions. Mice used restoration plantings less than natural vegetated dunes but more than open sand gaps, which suggests restoration plantings may facilitate movement of mice across fragmented areas. Both season and moon phase influenced the effect of habitat treatment, interactions which may be attributable to perceived risk associated with movement under a combination of different conditions of ambient light, vegetation cover, and habitat novelty. Our results show restoration plantings provide habitat for movement and foraging, and may ameliorate some consequences of sea level rise and storms for beach mice and potentially other dune-dependent species into the future.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1061-2971 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2311
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