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Author Davidson, T.M.; Altieri, A.H.; Ruiz, G.M.; Torchin, M.E.; Navarrete, S.
Title Bioerosion in a changing world: a conceptual framework Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecology Letters Abbreviated Journal Ecol Lett
Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 422-438
Keywords anthropogenic impacts; bioerosion; biogeomorphology; biotic interactions; climate change; ecosystem engineering; habitat complexity; habitat structure; ocean acidification
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ISSN 1461023X ISBN Medium
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1900
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Author Frishkoff, L.O.; Karp, D.S.; Flanders, J.R.; Zook, J.; Hadly, E.A.; Daily, G.C.; M'Gonigle, L.K.; Haddad, N.
Title Climate change and habitat conversion favour the same species Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecology Letters Abbreviated Journal Ecol Lett
Volume 19 Issue 9 Pages 1081-1090
Keywords Anthropocene; bird; climate niche; countryside biogeography; deforestation; habitat conversion; homogenisation
Abstract Land-use change and climate change are driving a global biodiversity crisis. Yet, how species' responses to climate change are correlated with their responses to land-use change is poorly understood. Here, we assess the linkages between climate and land-use change on birds in Neotropical forest and agriculture. Across > 300 species, we show that affiliation with drier climates is associated with an ability to persist in and colonise agriculture. Further, species shift their habitat use along a precipitation gradient: species prefer forest in drier regions, but use agriculture more in wetter zones. Finally, forest-dependent species that avoid agriculture are most likely to experience decreases in habitable range size if current drying trends in the Neotropics continue as predicted. This linkage suggests a synergy between the primary drivers of biodiversity loss. Because they favour the same species, climate and land-use change will likely homogenise biodiversity more severely than otherwise anticipated.
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1199
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Author Getz, W.M.; Marshall, C.R.; Carlson, C.J.; Giuggioli, L.; Ryan, S.J.; Romañach, S.S.; Boettiger, C.; Chamberlain, S.D.; Larsen, L.; D'Odorico, P.; O'Sullivan, D.; Coulson, T.
Title Making ecological models adequate Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecology Letters Abbreviated Journal Ecol Lett
Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 153-166
Keywords appropriate complexity modelling; coarse graining; disease modelling; ecosystems restoration models; environmental management models; extinction risk assessment; hierarchical modelling
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ISSN 1461023X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1925
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Author Nowakowski, A.J.; Watling, J.I.; Thompson, M.E.; Brusch IV, G.A.; Catenazzi, A.; Whitfield, S.M.; Kurz, D.J.; Suárez-Mayorga, Á.; Aponte-Gutiérrez, A.; Donnelly, M.A.; Todd, B.D.; Calcagno, V.
Title Thermal biology mediates responses of amphibians and reptiles to habitat modification Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecology Letters Abbreviated Journal Ecol Lett
Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 345-355
Keywords Agriculture; biodiversity; CTmax; ectotherm; fragmentation; global change; habitat loss; microclimate; phylogenetic signal; species traits
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ISSN 1461023X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1901
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Author Spaak, J.W.; Baert, J.M.; Baird, D.J.; Eisenhauer, N.; Maltby, L.; Pomati, F.; Radchuk, V.; Rohr, J.R.; Van den Brink, P.J.; De Laender, F.; Young, H.
Title Shifts of community composition and population density substantially affect ecosystem function despite invariant richness Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ecology Letters Abbreviated Journal Ecol Lett
Volume 20 Issue 10 Pages 1315-1324
Keywords Algae; biodiversity; coexistence; community ecology; modelling; primary production
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1693
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Author Vanderwel, M.C.; Zeng, H.; Caspersen, J.P.; Kunstler, G.; Lichstein, J.W.; Gravel, D.
Title Demographic controls of aboveground forest biomass across North America Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecology Letters Abbreviated Journal Ecol Lett
Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 414-423
Keywords biomass; carbon; growth; mortality; productivity; trees
Abstract Ecologists have limited understanding of how geographic variation in forest biomass arises from differences in growth and mortality at continental to global scales. Using forest inventories from across North America, we partitioned continental-scale variation in biomass growth and mortality rates of 49 tree species groups into (1) species-independent spatial effects and (2) inherent differences in demographic performance among species. Spatial factors that were separable from species composition explained 83% and 51% of the respective variation in growth and mortality. Moderate additional variation in mortality (26%) was attributable to differences in species composition. Age-dependent biomass models showed that variation in forest biomass can be explained primarily by spatial gradients in growth that were unrelated to species composition. Species-dependent patterns of mortality explained additional variation in biomass, with forests supporting less biomass when dominated by species that are highly susceptible to competition (e.g. Populus spp.) or to biotic disturbances (e.g. Abies balsamea).
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Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 981
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