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Author Erb, M.P.; Broccoli, A.J.; Graham, N.T.; Clement, A.C.; Wittenberg, A.T.; Vecchi, G.A.
Title Response of the Equatorial Pacific Seasonal Cycle to Orbital Forcing Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 28 Issue 23 Pages 9258-9276
Keywords Geographic location; entity; Pacific Ocean; Physical Meteorology and Climatology; Heat budgets; fluxes; Paleoclimate; Radiative forcing; Models and modeling; General circulation models; Variability; Seasonal cycle
Abstract The response of the equatorial Pacific Ocean's seasonal cycle to orbital forcing is explored using idealized simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean GCM in which eccentricity, obliquity, and the longitude of perihelion are altered while other boundary conditions are maintained at preindustrial levels. The importance of ocean dynamics in the climate response is investigated using additional simulations with a slab ocean version of the model. Precession is found to substantially influence the equatorial Pacific seasonal cycle through both thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms, while changes in obliquity have only a small effect. In the precession experiments, western equatorial Pacific SSTs respond in a direct thermodynamic manner to changes in insolation, while the eastern equatorial Pacific is first affected by the propagation of thermocline temperature anomalies from the west. These thermocline signals result from zonal wind anomalies associated with changes in the strength of subtropical anticyclones and shifts in the regions of convection in the western equatorial Pacific. The redistribution of heat from these thermocline signals, aided by the direct thermodynamic effect of insolation anomalies, results in large changes to the strength and timing of the eastern equatorial Pacific seasonal cycle. A comparison of 10 CMIP5 mid-Holocene experiments, in which the primary forcing is due to precession, shows that this response is relatively robust across models. Because equatorial Pacific SST anomalies have local climate impacts as well as nonlocal impacts through teleconnections, these results may be important to understanding paleoclimate variations both inside and outside of the tropical Pacific.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 852
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Author Misra, V.; Selman, C.; Waite, A. J.; Bastola, S.; Mishra, A.
Title Terrestrial and ocean climate of the 20th century Type Book Chapter
Year 2017 Publication Florida's climate: Changes, variations, & impacts Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 485-509
Keywords Seasonal cycle; Diurnal variations; Sea breeze; ENSO; Tropical cyclones; Hurricanes; AWP; AMO; PDO; PIZA
Abstract The Florida peninsula, with its close proximity to the equator surrounded by robust surface and deep water ocean currents, has a unique climate. Generally, its climate is mild with variations on numerous time scales, punctuated by periodic extreme weather events. In this chapter, we review the mechanisms by which some well-known natural variations impact the regional climate and modulate the occurrence of extreme weather over Florida and its neighboring oceans. In addition, we explore the role of land cover and land use changes on the regional climate over the same area. It is made apparent from the review that remote variations of climate have an equally important impact on the regional climate of Florida as the local changes to land cover and land use.
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Publisher Florida Climate Institute Place of Publication Gainesville, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P.; Jones, J. W.; Misra, V.; Obeysekera, J.
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1837
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Author Sejas, S.A.; Cai, M.; Hu, A.; Meehl, G.A.; Washington, W.; Taylor, P.C.
Title Individual Feedback Contributions to the Seasonality of Surface Warming Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 27 Issue 14 Pages 5653-5669
Keywords Carbon dioxide; Climate change; Feedback; Forcing; Surface temperature; Seasonal cycle
Abstract Using the climate feedback response analysis method, the authors examine the individual contributions of the CO2 radiative forcing and climate feedbacks to the magnitude, spatial pattern, and seasonality of the transient surface warming response in a 1% yr−1 CO2 increase simulation of the NCAR Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4). The CO2 forcing and water vapor feedback warm the surface everywhere throughout the year. The tropical warming is predominantly caused by the CO2 forcing and water vapor feedback, while the evaporation feedback reduces the warming. Most feedbacks exhibit noticeable seasonal variations; however, their net effect has little seasonal variation due to compensating effects, which keeps the tropical warming relatively invariant all year long. The polar warming has a pronounced seasonal cycle, with maximum warming in fall/winter and minimum warming in summer. In summer, the large cancelations between the shortwave and longwave cloud feedbacks and between the surface albedo feedback warming and the cooling from the ocean heat storage/dynamics feedback lead to a warming minimum. In polar winter, surface albedo and shortwave cloud feedbacks are nearly absent due to a lack of insolation. However, the ocean heat storage feedback relays the polar warming due to the surface albedo feedback from summer to winter, and the longwave cloud feedback warms the polar surface. Therefore, the seasonal variations in the cloud feedback, surface albedo feedback, and ocean heat storage/dynamics feedback, directly caused by the strong annual cycle of insolation, contribute primarily to the large seasonal variation of polar warming. Furthermore, the CO2 forcing and water vapor and atmospheric dynamics feedbacks add to the maximum polar warming in fall/winter.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 552
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