|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Misra, V.; Selman, C.; Waite, A. J.; Bastola, S.; Mishra, A.
Title Terrestrial and ocean climate of the 20th century Type Book Chapter
Year 2017 Publication Florida's climate: Changes, variations, & impacts Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 485-509
Keywords Seasonal cycle; Diurnal variations; Sea breeze; ENSO; Tropical cyclones; Hurricanes; AWP; AMO; PDO; PIZA
Abstract The Florida peninsula, with its close proximity to the equator surrounded by robust surface and deep water ocean currents, has a unique climate. Generally, its climate is mild with variations on numerous time scales, punctuated by periodic extreme weather events. In this chapter, we review the mechanisms by which some well-known natural variations impact the regional climate and modulate the occurrence of extreme weather over Florida and its neighboring oceans. In addition, we explore the role of land cover and land use changes on the regional climate over the same area. It is made apparent from the review that remote variations of climate have an equally important impact on the regional climate of Florida as the local changes to land cover and land use.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Florida Climate Institute Place of Publication Gainesville, FL Editor Chassignet, E. P.; Jones, J. W.; Misra, V.; Obeysekera, J.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1837
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rivera-Monroy, V.H.; Danielson, T.M.; Castañeda-Moya, E.; Marx, B.D.; Travieso, R.; Zhao, X.; Gaiser, E.E.; Farfan, L.M.
Title Long-term demography and stem productivity of Everglades mangrove forests (Florida, USA): Resistance to hurricane disturbance Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Forest Ecology and Management Abbreviated Journal Forest Ecology and Management
Volume 440 Issue Pages 79-91
Keywords Mangrove productivity Resistance Resilience Hurricane; Florida Coastal Everglades; Neotropics
Abstract Mangrove wetlands along coastal regions in neotropical northern latitudes are exposed to frequent hurricanes and therefore depend on resistant and resilient attributes to persist after these extreme events. However, few long-term studies have documented mangrove forest dynamics following hurricane disturbance to determine how species-specific phenotypic plasticity, species range shifts, and environmental stress interact to determine recovery trajectories. We present here a comprehensive analysis of Hurricane Wilma’s (hereafter, “Wilma”) impact (category 3, October 2005) on mangrove forest demography and aboveground net productivity in the Everglades, Florida (USA). We determined spatiotemporal patterns over a 15-year period (5 pre- and 10 post-Wilma) in three impacted sites on a productivity gradient along the Shark River Estuary. Hurricane resistance was evident in the low cumulative tree mortality and long-term recovery from defoliation (∼10 years). Aboveground standing carbon stocks were not significantly reduced, as mortality ranged only from 3 to 10%. A negative linear relationship between Leaf Net Primary Productivity (NPPL) and foliar residence time along the estuary shows that an increase in foliar production results in shorter residence time, which is defined by the interannual variation in NPPL rates and recovery periods across sites. We propose this relationship as a proxy of canopy recovery in latitudinal comparative studies across mangrove ecotypes and coastal settings. This work advances ecological disturbance theory and ecological modeling of mangrove forests; specifically, we provide quantitative relationships among structural properties and dynamic processes to validate agent-based demographic and biogeochemical models to forecast the impact of natural and human disturbances on mangrove wetlands under climate change.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-1127 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2281
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rypkema, D.C.; Rypkema DC; Horvitz, C.C.; Horvitz CC; Tuljapurkar, S.; Tuljapurkar S
Title How climate affects extreme events and hence ecological population models. Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume 100 Issue 6 Pages e02684
Keywords climate change; downscaling; extreme climatic events; generalized extreme value distributions; hurricanes; stochastic population models
Abstract Extreme events significantly impact ecosystems and are predicted to increase in frequency and/or magnitude with climate change. Generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions describe most ecologically relevant extreme events, including hurricanes, wildfires, and disease spread. In climate science, the GEV is widely used as an accurate and flexible tool over large spatial scales (>10(5) km(2) ) to study how changes in climate shift extreme events. However, ecologists rarely use the GEV to study how climate change affects populations. Here we show how to estimate a GEV for hurricanes at an ecologically relevant (<10(3) km(2) ) spatial scale, and use the results in a stochastic, empirically based, matrix population model. As a case study, we use an understory shrub in southeast Florida, USA with hurricane-driven dynamics and measure the effects of change using the stochastic population growth rate. We use sensitivities to analyze how population growth rate is affected by changes in hurricane frequency and intensity, canopy damage levels, and canopy recovery rates. Our results emphasize the importance of accurately estimating location-specific storm frequency. In a rapidly changing world, our methods show how to combine realistic extreme event and population models to assess ecological impacts and to prioritize conservation actions for at-risk populations.
Address Department of Biology, Stanford University, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, California, 94305, USA.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language eng Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 (Linking) ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2341
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Scheitlin, K.N.; Mesev, V.; Elsner, J.B.
Title Polyline averaging using distance surfaces: A spatial hurricane climatology Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Computers & Geosciences Abbreviated Journal Computers & Geosciences
Volume 52 Issue Pages 126-131
Keywords Hurricane; Linear tracks; Geovisualization; Distance surfaces; Climate study
Abstract The US Gulf states are frequently hit by hurricanes, causing widespread damage resulting in economic loss and occasional human fatalities. Current hurricane climatologies and predictive models frequently omit information on the spatial characteristics of hurricane movement their linear tracks. We investigate the construction of a spatial hurricane climatology that condenses linear tracks to one-dimensional polylines. With the aid of distance surfaces, an average hurricane track is calculated by summing polylines as part of a grid-based algorithm. We demonstrate the procedure on a particularly vulnerable coastline around the city of Galveston in Texas, where the tracks of the closest storms to Galveston are also weighted by an inverse distance function. Track averaging is also applied as a means of interpolating possible paths of historical storms where records are sporadic observations, and sometimes anecdotal. We offer the average track as a convenient regional summary of expected hurricane movement. The average track, together with other hurricane attributes, also provides a means to assess the expected local vulnerability of property and environmental damage.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0098-3004 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 433
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Servais, S.; Kominoski, J.S.; Davis, S.E.; Gaiser, E.E.; Pachn, J.; Troxler, T.G.
Title Effects of Nutrient-Limitation on Disturbance Recovery in Experimental Mangrove Wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Wetlands Abbreviated Journal Wetlands
Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 337-347
Keywords Peat; Nutrients; Coastal storms; Climate change; Hurricanes
Abstract Coastal wetlands are exposed to high-energy storms that influence plant and soil structure. To understand how nutrient availability interacts with storm-induced plant stress, we tested how defoliation interacts with nutrient enrichment to affect carbon (C) and nutrient (nitrogen, N; phosphorus, P) cycling and storage within soils and plants. In outdoor experimental mesocosms, we defoliated red mangrove saplings (Rhizophora mangle), added 30g of inorganic P to peat soils, and quantified plant [elemental stoichiometry (C:N, C:P, N:P), leaf count, and above- and below- ground biomass] and soil responses [C:N, C:P, N:P, litter breakdown rate (k), soil CO2 efflux] during a 42-d recovery period. Mangroves rapidly regrew all removed leaves and recovered nearly 30% of leaf biomass. Mangrove biomass %P increased by 50% with added P; however, soil stoichiometry remained unchanged. Defoliation reduced Soil CO2 efflux by 40% and root litter k by 30%. Phosphorus was quickly incorporated into mangrove biomass and stimulated nighttime soil CO2 efflux. This work highlights the importance of testing interactions of nutrient availability and plant stress on plant and soil biogeochemical cycling and suggests that plants quickly incorporate available nutrients into biomass and defoliation can lead to reduced soil C losses.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0277-5212 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2302
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sheng, Y.P.; Zou, R.
Title Assessing the role of mangrove forest in reducing coastal inundation during major hurricanes Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Hydrobiologia Abbreviated Journal Hydrobiologia
Volume 803 Issue 1 Pages 87-103
Keywords CH3D-SWAN; Coastal inundation; Hurricane Andrew; Biscayne Bay; Mangroves and marshes
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1737
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Solis, D; Perruso, L; del Corral, J; Stoffle, B; Letson, D
Title Measuring the initial economic effects of hurricanes on commercial fish production: the US Gulf of Mexico grouper (Serranidae) fishery Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Natural Hazards Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Hurricanes; Economic damage; Commercial fisheries; Stochastic production frontier; US Gulf of Mexico
Abstract A stochastic production frontier was used to measure the initial (i.e., bi-weekly) economic effects of hurricanes on commercial grouper (Serranidae) production in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the United States Gulf of Mexico from 2005 to 2009. We estimated the economic effects of productivity losses associated with specific hurricanes on the commercial grouper fleet. We also calculated the economic effects due to productivity losses during an entire hurricane season at the regional level. The empirical model controls for input levels as well as other factors affecting production to isolate the initial economic effect caused by hurricanes from other non-weather-related factors. The empirical results revealed that hurricanes striking the Gulf of Mexico coastline from 2005 to 2009 had a negative effect on the production of the commercial grouper fleet. The results also demonstrated the relative importance of inputs and regulations on fish production.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 300
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Song, J; Peng, Z; Zhao, L; Hsu, C-H
Title Developing a theoretical framework for integrated vulnerability of businesses to sea level rise Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Natural Hazards Abbreviated Journal
Volume 84 Issue 2 Pages 1219-1239
Keywords Business vulnerability index; Sea level rise; Coastal flooding; Hurricane
Abstract Sea level rise (SLR), as a likely outcome of climate change, threatens coastal communities through intensified storm surge, strong wind, flooding, and other extreme weather events. While social vulnerability to SLR is receiving overwhelming attention from research communities, studies on the business impacts of SLR are much less developed. In this study, an innovative framework of integrated business vulnerability is developed for environmental hazards (e.g., SLR) and is validated by a case study of Bay County, Florida. First, the model establishes a composite business vulnerability index (BVI) by incorporating business characteristics, infrastructure factors, and other indicators based on existing literature results. Second, it identifies impacted business indicators and how they will change with the projected SLR. To account for climate change uncertainty, floodplains are generated under three SLR levels (0, 0.2, and 0.9 m). Finally, this study uses a GIS-based methodology to combine physical and business vulnerabilities to investigate overall susceptibility and how this changes with SLR. Two important findings are identified. First, business vulnerability to flooding will be escalated substantially by SLR. Considerable amount of areas, businesses, and road networks would be exposed to highest flood risk zones due to SLR. Second, highest flood risk zones do not necessarily intersect with those areas of high BVI. The results can help local governments better allocate financial and manpower resources and assist hazard mitigation teams, urban planners, and city managers in steering business development away from high-risk regions due to SLR.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1113
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Staehling, E.M.; Truchelut, R.E.
Title Diagnosing United States hurricane landfall risk: An alternative to count-based methodologies Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Geophysical Research Letters Abbreviated Journal Geophys. Res. Lett.
Volume 43 Issue 16 Pages 8798-8805
Keywords tropical cyclones; natural hazard; hurricanes; landfall; tropical meteorology; climate
Abstract Assessing hurricane landfall risk is of immense public utility, yet extant methods of diagnosing annual tropical cyclone (TC) activity demonstrate no skill in diagnosing U.S. hurricane landfalls. Atlantic TC count itself has limited skill, explaining less than 20% of interannual variance in landfall incidence. Using extended landfall activity and reanalysis data sets, we employed empirical Poisson modeling to produce a landfall diagnostic index (LDI), incorporating spatially and temporally averaged upper level divergence, relative sea surface temperature, meridional wind, and zonal shear vorticity. LDI captures 31% of interannual variability of U.S. hurricane landfalls and offers physical insight into why indices that successfully capture TC activity fail to diagnose landfalls: there is inherent tension between conditions likely to steer hurricanes toward the U.S. and conditions favorable for TC development. Given this tension, attempting to diagnose, predict, or understand TC count is inadequate for quantifying societal impacts due to landfalling hurricanes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0094-8276 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1228
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Torres, H.R.; Alsharif, K.A.; Tobin, G.A.
Title Perspectives on Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change in Hazardous Environments: Insights from Broward County, Florida Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Weather, Climate, and Society Abbreviated Journal Wea. Climate Soc.
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Social Science; Coastlines; Hurricanes/typhoons; Sea level; Communications/decision making; Planning
Abstract Particular social factors can limit or promote adaptive capacity and resilience in hazardous environments. Understanding these factors is essential for developing planning tools for risk reduction and response. In this qualitative study, focus groups are used to learn about homeowners' experiences with a disturbance event, as well as their perceptions and expectations regarding local climate adaptation. The analysis provides insights about how risk perceptions, insurance practices, and social networks may influence individuals' willingness and ability to cope with a disaster. Potential social limits to adaptation among participants included inaccurate risk perceptions based on experiences and feelings of helplessness, and a lack of political trust at the state level. Existing social resources that may be more formally leveraged to enhance adaptive capacity include knowledge reserves of long-term residents, strong 'bonding capital,' and trust in local, nonelected government employees. The study concludes that social dimensions of adaptation, including individuals' values, beliefs, and social norms, can have a powerful influence on the effectiveness of local adaptation planning in the face of hazards and global environmental change.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1948-8327 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2171
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Trepanier, J.C.; Needham, H.F.; Elsner, J.B.; Jagger, T.H.
Title Combining Surge and Wind Risk from Hurricanes Using a Copula Model: An Example from Galveston, Texas Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication The Professional Geographer Abbreviated Journal The Professional Geographer
Volume 67 Issue 1 Pages 52-61
Keywords copula; extreme winds; hurricanes; risk; storm surge
Abstract Consideration of climate-related impacts on coasts is important to ensure readiness for disaster response. Local risk of storm surge and strong winds from hurricanes affecting Galveston, Texas, is quantified using a bivariate copula model fit to observed data. The model uses a two-dimensional Archimedean copula. Parametric uncertainty (5th and 95th percentiles) is quantified using a Monte Carlo procedure. The annual probability of a hurricane producing winds of at least 50 ms&#8722;1 and a surge of at least 4 m is 1.7 percent with a 95 percent confidence interval of (1.33, 1.78) percent. The methodology can be extended to include inland flooding and can be applied elsewhere with available information.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-0124 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 643
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, C.; Wang, X.; Weisberg, R.H.; Black, M.L.
Title Variability of tropical cyclone rapid intensification in the North Atlantic and its relationship with climate variations Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Climate Dynamics Abbreviated Journal Clim Dyn
Volume 49 Issue 11-12 Pages 3627-3645
Keywords Tropical cyclones; Climate variability; Hurricane activity
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0930-7575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1795
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Widener, M.J.; Horner, M.W.; Metcalf, S.S.
Title Simulating the effects of social networks on a population's hurricane evacuation participation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Geographical Systems Abbreviated Journal J Geogr Syst
Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 193-209
Keywords Hurricane evacuation; Agent-based model; Social networks; Social media
Abstract Scientists have noted that recent shifts in the earth's climate have resulted in more extreme weather events, like stronger hurricanes. Such powerful storms disrupt societal function and result in a tremendous number of casualties, as demonstrated by recent hurricane experience in the US Planning for and facilitating evacuations of populations forecast to be impacted by hurricanes is perhaps the most effective strategy for reducing risk. A potentially important yet relatively unexplored facet of people's evacuation decision-making involves the interpersonal communication processes that affect whether at-risk residents decide to evacuate. While previous research has suggested that word-of-mouth effects are limited, data supporting these assertions were collected prior to the widespread adoption of digital social media technologies. This paper argues that the influence of social network effects on evacuation decisions should be revisited given the potential of new social media for impacting and augmenting information dispersion through real-time interpersonal communication. Using geographic data within an agent-based model of hurricane evacuation in Bay County, Florida, we examine how various types of social networks influence participation in evacuation. It is found that strategies for encouraging evacuation should consider the social networks influencing individuals during extreme events, as it can be used to increase the number of evacuating residents.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1435-5930 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 431
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Worsnop, R.P.; Bryan, G.H.; Lundquist, J.K.; Zhang, J.A.
Title Using Large-Eddy Simulations to Define Spectral and Coherence Characteristics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer for Wind-Energy Applications Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Boundary-Layer Meteorology Abbreviated Journal Boundary-Layer Meteorol
Volume 165 Issue 1 Pages 55-86
Keywords Hurricane boundary layer; Large-eddy simulation; Tropical cyclone; Wind-turbine design
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-8314 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1692
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang,; Zou,; Ray,
Title Comparison of TC Temperature and Water Vapor Climatologies between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans from GPS RO Observations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Climate Abbreviated Journal J. Climate
Volume 31 Issue 20 Pages 8557-8571
Keywords Hurricanes/typhoons; Global positioning systems (GPS)
Abstract Tropical cyclone (TC) temperature and water vapor structures are essential atmospheric variables. In this study, global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations from the GPS RO mission named the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate and the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding on board both MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellites over the 9-yr period from 2007 to 2015 are used to generate a set of composite structures of temperature and water vapor fields within tropical depressions (TDs), tropical storms (TSs), and hurricanes (HUs) over the Atlantic Ocean and TDs, TSs, and typhoons (TYs) over the western Pacific Ocean. The composite TC structures are different over the two oceanic regions, reflecting different climatological environments. The warm cores for TCs over the western Pacific Ocean have higher altitudes and larger sizes than do those over the Atlantic Ocean for all storm categories. A radial variation of the warm-core temperature anomaly with descending altitude is seen, probably resulting from spiral cloud and rainband features. The large TC water vapor pressure anomalies, which are often more difficult to obtain than temperature anomalies, are located below the maximum warm-core temperature anomaly centers. Thus, the maximum values of the fractional water vapor pressure anomaly, defined as the anomaly divided by the environmental value, for TSs and HUs over the Atlantic Ocean (1.4% for TSs and 2.2% for HUs) are higher than those for TSs and TYs over the western Pacific Ocean (1.2% for TSs and 1.4% for TYs). These TC structures are obtained only after a quality control procedure is implemented, which consists of a range check that removes negative refractivity values and unrealistic temperature values, as well as a biweight check that removes data that deviate from the biweight mean by more than 3 times the biweight standard deviation. A limitation of the present study is an inability to resolve the TC inner-core structures because of a lack of sufficient RO profiles that collocate with TCs in their inner-core regions and the relatively coarse along-track resolutions of GPS RO data.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-8755 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2194
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, D.; Yang, A.; Qiu, H.; Zhou, Y.; Herrero, H.; Fu, C.-S.; Yu, Q.; Tang, J.
Title A Citizen-Contributed GIS Approach for Evaluating the Impacts of Land Use on Hurricane-Harvey-Induced Flooding in Houston Area Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Land Abbreviated Journal Land
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 25
Keywords citizen science; hurricane Harvey; flooding
Abstract Hurricane Harvey (2017) caused widespread flash flooding by extremely heavy rainfall and resulted in tremendous damage, including 82 fatalities and huge economic loss in the Houston, Texas area. To reduce hazards, loss, and to improve urban resilience, it is important to understand the factors that influence the occurrence of flooding events. People rely on natural resources and different land uses to reduce the severity of flood impacts and mitigate the risk. In this study, we focused the impacts of land use on Hurricane-Harvey-induced flooding inside and outside the Houston city center. With the recent trend that more citizen scientists serve in delivering information about natural disaster response, local residents in Houston areas participated in delineating the flooded areas in Hurricane Harvey. The flooding information used here generated a published map with citizen-contributed flooding data. A regional model framework with spatial autocovariates was employed to understand those interactions. Different land use patterns and types affected the potential of flooding events differently inside and outside Houston's city center. Explicitly, we found agricultural and open space were associated with high risk of flooding outside the city center, industrial lands increased the high risk of flooding in city center, and residential areas reduced the potential of flooding both inside and outside the city center. The results can assist with future land use strategy in Houston and other areas, and mitigate potential flash flooding. This study also highlighted the contribution of citizen science to responses to natural hazards.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-445X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 2240
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, K.; Thapa, B.; Ross, M.; Gann, D.
Title Remote sensing of seasonal changes and disturbances in mangrove forest: a case study from South Florida Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages e01366
Keywords chilling event; disturbance; freeze; hurricane; Landsat; LiDAR; mangrove; NDMI; NDVI; seasonal change; South Florida; Special Feature: Extreme Cold Spells; vegetation index
Abstract Knowledge of the spatial and temporal changes caused by episodic disturbances and seasonal variability is essential for understanding the dynamics of mangrove forests at the landscape scale, and for building a baseline that allows detection of the effects of future environmental change. In combination with LiDAR data, we calculated four vegetation indices from 150 Landsat TM images from 1985 to 2011 in order to detect seasonal changes and distinguish them from disturbances due to hurricanes and chilling events in a mangrove-dominated coastal landscape. We found that normalized difference moisture index (NDMI) performed best in identifying both seasonal and event-driven episodic changes. Mangrove responses to chilling and hurricane events exhibited distinct spatial patterns. Severe damage from intense chilling events was concentrated in the interior dwarf and transition mangrove forests with tree heights less than 4 m, while severe damage from intense hurricanes was limited to the mangrove forest near the coast, where tree heights were more than 4 m. It took 4-7 months for damage from intense chilling events and hurricanes to reach their full extent, and took 2-6 yr for the mangrove forest to recover from these -disturbances. There was no significant trend in the vegetation changes represented by NDMI over the -27-yr period, but seasonal signals from both dwarf and fringe mangrove forests were discernible. Only severe damage from hurricanes and intense chilling events could be detected in Landsat images, while damage from weak chilling events could not be separated from the background seasonal change.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1106
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, M.; Chen, X.; Kumar, M.; Marani, M.; Goralczyk, M.
Title Hurricanes and tropical storms: A necessary evil to ensure water supply? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Hydrological Processes Abbreviated Journal Hydrological Processes
Volume 31 Issue 24 Pages 4414-4428
Keywords distributed hydrologic modelling; drought; hurricanes; reservoir management; tropical storms; water supply
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0885-6087 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number FCI @ refbase @ Serial 1804
Permanent link to this record